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I want to make an IEnumerable<TSource> extension that can convert itself to a IEnumerable<SelectListItem>. So far I have been trying to do it this way:

    public static 
      IEnumerable<SelectListItem> ToSelectItemList<TSource, TKey>(this 
      IEnumerable<TSource> enumerable, Func<TSource, TKey> text, 
                                       Func<TSource, TKey> value)
    {
        List<SelectListItem> selectList = new List<SelectListItem>();

        foreach (TSource model in enumerable)
            selectList.Add(new SelectListItem() { Text = ?, Value = ?});

        return selectList;
    }

Is this the right way to go about doing it? If so how do I draw the values from the appropriate values from the Func<TSource, TKey> ?

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5  
You might also consider forgetting selectList and doing foreach (...) yield return new SelectListItem { ... }, which allows deferred execution (which is more LINQ-y). –  Rawling May 29 '12 at 12:44
1  
why are you not just using Select? –  jk. May 29 '12 at 14:12
    
There are a lot of places in my code where I will be calling this and from looking at the Select function it seems that I would have to write more code then doing this way. Using Select I would have to write the code to instantiate a SelectListItem instead of just passing in the Func<>. Plus using this method the code that handles transferring to a SelectListItem is encapsulated and stored in one area of my code instead of all around my application. –  Rick Eyre May 29 '12 at 14:22
    
I think what you really need is a factory/constructor for a SelectListItem from a TSource and your two Func<TSource, TKey>s - the projection from IEnumerable<Tsource> to IEnumerable<SelectListItem> is Select –  jk. May 29 '12 at 15:43
    
What would be the advantage of that over this method? Does the .Select() function have some kind of efficiency or something over this extension method? –  Rick Eyre May 29 '12 at 18:06
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7 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You just need to use the two functions you supply as parameters to extract the text and the value. Assuming both text and value are strings you don't need the TKey type parameter. And there is no need to create a list in the extension method. An iterator block using yield return is preferable and how similar extension methods in LINQ are built.

public static IEnumerable<SelectListItem> ToSelectItemList<TSource>(
  this IEnumerable<TSource> enumerable,
  Func<TSource, string> text,
  Func<TSource, string> value)
{ 
  foreach (TSource model in enumerable) 
    yield return new SelectListItem { Text = text(model), Value = value(model) };
}

You can use it like this (you need to supply the two lambdas):

var selectedItems = items.ToSelecListItem(x => ..., x => ...);

However, you could just as well use Enumerable.Select:

var selectedItems = items.Select(x => new SelectListItem { Text = ..., Value = ... });
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I use something similar occasionally, though I add 3 optional parameters (defaulted to false and 2 empty strings) and start the method with if (includeEmptyOption) yield return new SelectListItem { Text = emptyOptionText, Value = emptyOptionValue }; Parameters ordered as used so I can specify emptyOptionText and get default emptyOptionValue of "". –  Chris Shaffer May 30 '12 at 2:03
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You're re-inventing the wheel. It is what Enumerable.Select intended for.

EDIT BY @KeithS: To answer the question, if you want this output, you can define an extension method wrapping Enumerable.Select:

public static IEnumerable<SelectListItem> ToSelectItemList<TSource>(
  this IEnumerable<TSource> enumerable,
  Func<TSource, string> text,
  Func<TSource, string> value)
{ 
  return enumerable.Select(x=>new SelectListItem{Text=text(x), Value=value(x));
}
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You're on the right path.

Funcs are methods stored in variables, and are invoked like normal methods.

public static IEnumerable<SelectListItem> ToSelectItemList<TSource, TKey>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> enumerable,
    Func<TSource, TKey> text,
    Func<TSource, TKey> value)
{
    List<SelectListItem> selectList = new List<SelectListItem>();

    foreach (TSource model in enumerable)
    {
        selectList.Add(new SelectListItem()
        {
            Text = text(model),
            Value = value(model)
        });
    }

    return selectList;
}

If I might recommend, your Funcs should be Func<TSource, string> as the text and value are strings in the SelectListItem.

Edit Just thought of this...

Also you don't have to create an inner list but can do a yield return instead. Below is my "optimized" version of your method.

public static IEnumerable<SelectListItem> ToSelectItemList<TSource>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> enumerable,
    Func<TSource, string> text,
    Func<TSource, string> value)
{
    foreach (TSource model in enumerable)
    {
        yield return new SelectListItem()
        {
            Text = text(model),
            Value = value(model)
        };
    }
}

Here is the reference for yeild return. It allows you to return the your results as an element in an enumerable, constructing your enumerable invisibly (to you).

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9k7k7cf0.aspx

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In your recommendation, did you mean Func<TSource, string>? –  Richard May 29 '12 at 12:43
    
Yes. I added an edit with updated code. –  Thinking Sites May 29 '12 at 12:47
    
How would I call something like this? I'm still new to this. –  Rick Eyre May 29 '12 at 12:50
1  
Cool, nice use of yield return as well. –  Richard May 29 '12 at 12:55
    
To invoke an extension method, reference its namespace in the using section where you hold your other usings. Then you will be able to invoke the method as if it were a native method of your Enumerable. This link should describe it better than me: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb311042.aspx –  Thinking Sites May 29 '12 at 12:56
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To me it seems like crossing a river to get water. Why not simply use select?

enumerable.Select(item => 
                    new SelectListItem{
                          Text = item.SomeProperty, 
                           Value item.SomeOtherProperty
                    }).ToList();

if you really do want a method then you could do this:

public static 
      IEnumerable<SelectListItem> ToSelectItemList<TSource, TKey>(this 
      IEnumerable<TSource> enumerable, Func<TSource, TKey> text, 
                                       Func<TSource, TKey> value)
    {
        return (from item in enumerable
                select new SelectListItem{
                      Text = text(item),
                      Value = value(item)
                }).ToList();  
    }
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A LINQ way of achieving what you want would be:

public static IEnumerable<SelectListItem> ToSelectItemList<TSource, TKey>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> enumerable, 
    Func<TSource, TKey> textSelector, 
    Func<TSource, TKey> valueSelector)
{
    return from model in enumerable
           select new SelectListItem 
           { 
               Text = textSelector(model), 
               Value = valueSelector(model) 
           };
}
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thanks for replicating my answer. A good point bares repeating :) (to replicate the functionality you should however convert to a list or at least state why you think that's not a good idea) –  Rune FS May 29 '12 at 12:59
    
It looks to me like our answers are slightly different, you convert to a list whereas I don't. It's not necessary to convert to a list as the function declaration specifies the result is IEnumerable, by not converting to a list a caller of the function could compose the result with other LINQ operations and therefore short-circuit the full enumeration of the source (e.g. .First, .Single, etc.) –  Patrick McDonald May 29 '12 at 13:53
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Within the body of your extension method, those two parameters are just delegates, and you can run them like any other function:

        selectList.Add(new SelectListItem() { Text = text(model), Value = value(model)});
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Other solutions work as well, but I think that the one from Martin Liversage is the best way to do it:

IEnumerable<SelectListItem> selectListItems = items.Select(x => 
    new SelectListItem 
        { 
            Text = x.TextProperty, 
            Value = x.ValueProperty 
        });
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