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I was searching for a way to do this myself, and came up with this method:

<?php
$script_name = $_SERVER['SCRIPT_NAME']; // to get www.myurl.com

// create a constant out of the server_name
define('HTTP_HOST', $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'].'/');

$path_parts = pathinfo($script_name); // returns an array with path names

// get the filename with the extension
$file_name = $path_parts['filename'] . '.' . $path_parts['extension'];
// get the directory which the script lives in
$dir = rtrim($script_name, $file_name);
// trim of the left slash since it was added on the end of the HTTP_HOST constant
$dir = ltrim($dir, '/');
// store the server name and directory paths in a variable
$dir = HTTP_HOST.$dir;

echo $dir; // will return f.ex. "www.myurl.com/dir1/dir2/dir3/"

Lets say I have a file called "testfile.php" which lives under directory "dir3" at "www.myurl.com/dir1/dir2/dir3", so the full url would be "www.myurl.com/dir1/dir2/dir3/testfile.php".

If I declare a constant for the URL plus full directory path in my paths file, or some configuration file which I include in f.ex my index file, and call that constant inside testfile.php end echo it. It will echo out "www.myurl.com/dir1/dir2/dir3/".

My question is, is this method acceptable or is there a better way to achieve the URL with directory path to a given file?

Thank you.

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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This should work:

$dir = $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] . substr(dirname(__FILE__), strlen($_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT']));
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Works perferctly! :) Thank you. –  Villi Magg May 29 '12 at 13:30
    
__FILE__ return a realpath, substr won't work if the webserver uses an alias directive or the file-system has symlinks. Fragile this is. –  hakre May 29 '12 at 13:31
    
@hakre, you're right. To get rid of symlinks issue we have to use $_SERVER["SCRIPT_FILENAME"] instead of __FILE__. For aliases - there is no solution as the file is out of root. Need to handle this situation. But again, if we run php using cgi - then $_SERVER array can be not fully set, and its fragile again :) Need to think about majority, and for majority it will solve problem. –  Vitaly Dyatlov May 29 '12 at 13:54
    
As you can't cover all cases, encapsulate what varies, e.g. put it into an object of it's own with a defined interface. –  hakre May 29 '12 at 14:05
    
Ok, so I use substr(dirname($_SERVER["SCRIPT_FILENAME"]), strlen($_SERVER["DOCUMENT_ROOT"])) instead of just dirname(__FILE__)? –  Villi Magg May 29 '12 at 16:59
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As we all know, perfectionism is hard to achieve. This implies that very often there is a better way to achieve things.

Looking at the code in your question, I'm pretty sure, that there is a better way to achieve what you're looking for. So back to your question:

My question is, is this method acceptable or is there a better way to achieve the URL with directory path to a given file?

The answer is yes. For example, a better way is to encapsulate the implementation into an object of it's own, e.g. a file-mapper. This will allow you to always make use of the best way which can change over time.

You should start at least with a function that encapsulate the logic to map a filename to a webdirectory. Also make use of so called inputs, and deal with them at the top of the code:

function get_webdirectory_of_file($file)
{
   # input (and validation)

   $host = $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'];
   $docroot = $_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT'];

   if (!is_file($file) {
       throw new Exception('Not a file');
   }

   if (!$host) {
       throw new Exception('No HTTP_HOST found.');
   }

   if (!$docroot ) {
       throw new Exception('No DOCUMENT_ROOT found.');
   }  

   $len = strlen($docroot);

   if (substr($file, 0, $len) !== $docroot) {
       throw new Exception('Unable to map file out of document root to document root');
   }

   # processing

   $dir = substr(dirname($file), $len);

   # output 

   return $host . $dir;
}

As the code is inside a function of it's own, you can improve it over time without changing (much of) the rest of your application. Using an object is better because you can replace it easier making the whole more flexible, but starting with a function is a good idea, too. Usage example:

 echo get_webdirectory_of_file(__FILE__);

Looking at your code:

<?php
$script_name = $_SERVER['SCRIPT_NAME']; // to get www.myurl.com

Please check the PHP manual about problems with using that $_SERVER variable.

// create a constant out of the server_name
define('HTTP_HOST', $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'].'/');

As $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] already exists, there is no need to create a constant. This does only hide problems related in the use of that constant later on. I suggest you to remove that constant from your code.

$path_parts = pathinfo($script_name); // returns an array with path names

// get the filename with the extension
$file_name = $path_parts['filename'] . '.' . $path_parts['extension'];

Actually, what you're looking for here is basename and that's it:

$file_name = basename($_SERVER['SCRIPT_NAME']);

Now on with your code:

// get the directory which the script lives in
$dir = rtrim($script_name, $file_name);

This hurts a bit. Please re-read what the rtrim function does. You don't want to use it here.

// trim of the left slash since it was added on the end of the HTTP_HOST constant
$dir = ltrim($dir, '/');

Using ltrim for such a case might look clever but often this is a smell that you have not understood what you actually do and with which input values you work. Compare with using the constant as well:

// store the server name and directory paths in a variable
$dir = HTTP_HOST.$dir;

You re-use a variable name here ($dir). That's normally not helpful. Also if you first add / only to remove / a line above, this makes no sense. You could spare both.

echo $dir; // will return f.ex. "www.myurl.com/dir1/dir2/dir3/"

Sure, question is for what you need it and how stable it is. As written, I'm totally sure, there is a much better way to do that, yes.

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Thank you, I will keep that in mind :) –  Villi Magg May 29 '12 at 13:29
    
I see I have some more reading to do :), Thank you for this valuable information. –  Villi Magg May 29 '12 at 13:42
    
@VilliMagg: I added you a code example as well I hope it's easy enough to understand. –  hakre May 29 '12 at 13:42
    
Thank you, I will try your code and let you know how it works :) –  Villi Magg May 29 '12 at 17:01
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See if this works:

function getCurrentPageURL() {
  $protocol = "http";
  if ($_SERVER["HTTPS"] == "on") {$protocol .= "s";}
  $protocol .= "://";

  $server = $_SERVER["SERVER_NAME"];

  if ($_SERVER["SERVER_PORT"] != "80") {
      $page = $server .  ":" . $_SERVER["SERVER_PORT"].$_SERVER["REQUEST_URI"];
   } else {
      $page = $server . $_SERVER["REQUEST_URI"];
   }
   return $protocol . $pageURL;
}

This solution accounts for different ports and HTTPS protocol.

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There is some good stuff in this function. Although it returned the URL + filename.php. But that's easy to fix :) Thank you. –  Villi Magg May 29 '12 at 13:31
    
this also return request parameters :) To get rid of params need to use SCRIPT_NAME instead of REQUEST_URI –  Vitaly Dyatlov May 29 '12 at 13:59
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