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So I've got a Windows service written in c#. The service class derives from ServiceBase, and starting and stopping the service calls instance methods OnStart and OnStop respectively. Here's SSCE of the class:

partial class CometService : ServiceBase
{
    private Server<Bla> server;
    private ManualResetEvent mre;
    public CometService()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }       
    protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
    {
        //starting the server takes a while, but we need to complete quickly
        //here so let's spin off a thread so we can return pronto.
        new Thread(() =>
        {
            try
            {
                server = new Server<Bla>();
            }
            finally
            {
                mre.Set()
            }
        })
        {
            IsBackground = false
        }.Start();
    }

    protected override void OnStop()
    {
        //ensure start logic is completed before continuing
        mre.WaitOne();
        server.Stop();
    }
}

As can be seen, there's quite a lot of logic that requires that when we call OnStop, we're dealing with the same instance of ServiceBase as when we called OnStart.

Can I be sure that this is the case?

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1  
Yes, you can be sure. –  zmbq May 29 '12 at 13:19
    
Put that in an answer with a reference and I'll hand you the points! –  spender May 29 '12 at 13:20
    
Um. Are you sure you want to do IsBackground = true? If you return from OnStart and only background threads are running, the process might be shut down - so it's only by luck/timing (that that thread has already made sufficient forward progress to launch the Server) that the service stays up. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 29 '12 at 13:39
    
Indeed... actually it isn't like that in the actual code, so please ignore. Will fix up the example though. –  spender May 29 '12 at 14:13
    
IsBackground = true is fine. The service will be kept in memory until OnStop is called - that is what being a service means. If your OnStart and OnStop methods were empty the process would still stay in memory when started. –  Demented Devil Jul 23 '12 at 1:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you look in the Program.cs class, you'll see code like the following:

private static void Main()
{
    ServiceBase.Run(new ServiceBase[]
                {
                    new CometService()
                });
}

That is, the instance is created by code within your own project. It's that one instance that all Service Manager calls (including OnStart and OnStop) are made against.

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I guess is the same instance. You can do a quick test adding a static field in the class to keep track of the reference to the object used in the OnStart and comparing it to the instance of the OnStop.

private static CometService instance = null;

protected override void OnStart(...)
{
    instance = this;
    ...
}

protected override void OnStop()
{
    object.ReferenceEquals(this, instance);
    ...
}
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