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I am trying to create a string that points to a file and am getting this error:

.../testApp.cpp:75: error: invalid operands of types 'const char*' and 'const char [5]' to binary 'operator+'

Here is the line in question:

    string path = "images/" + i + ".png";        

This seems like a fairly simple issue, yet it confounds me. I also included the string header:

#include <string>
using namespace std
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What is the type of i? –  hmjd May 29 '12 at 13:27
    
@hmjd i is an int –  Miles May 29 '12 at 13:28
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6 Answers

You need to convert i to a std::string:

string path = "images/" + boost::lexical_cast<string>(i) + ".png";

For other approaches to converting an int to a std::string see Append an int to a std::string

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or boost::format:

std::string str = (boost::format("images/%d.png") % i).str();

boost::format(FORMATTED_STIRNG) % .. %.. %.. is for formatted string processing, see wiki. this function gives you back a special boost format which you need to cast to std::string using its .str() member function.

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Please don't just post a single line of code. Explain it. -1 –  Manishearth May 30 '12 at 11:52
    
sorry, I considered the syntax to be quite obvious. but I added explanation now. –  chaiy May 30 '12 at 17:14
    
Undownvote-upvoted. Try to do this for your future posts as well :) –  Manishearth May 30 '12 at 17:19
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Use a stringstream instead, std::string doesn't support off-the-rack formatting for integers.

std::stringstream ss;
ss << "images/" << i << ".png";
std::string path = ss.str();
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With C++11 we get a set of to_string functions that can help converting built in numeric types to std::string. You can use that in your conversion:

string path = "images/" + to_string(i) + ".png";         
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To quote all of the other answers, yes, std::string doesn't have built in support for appending integers. However, you can add an operator to do just that:

template<typename T>
std::string operator +(const std::string &param1, const T& param2)
{
    std::stringstream ss;
    ss << param1 << param2;

    return ss.str();
}

template <typename T>
std::string operator +(const T& param1, const std::string& param2) {
    std::stringstream ss;
    ss << param1 << param2;

    return ss.str();
}

template <typename T>
std::string& operator +=(std::string& param1, const T& param2) 
{
    std::stringstream ss;
    ss << param1 << param2;

    param1 = ss.str();
    return param1;
}

The only real disadvantage to this is you must first cast one of the literals to a string, like this:

string s = string("Hello ") + 10 + "World!";
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I'd want to test this thoroughly before using it, this could potentially cause certail well defined behavior to suddenly get an ambiguity error. –  Mooing Duck May 29 '12 at 14:21
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You are trying to concatenate string literals as if they are std::string objects. They are not. In C++ string literals are of type const char[], not std::string.

To join two string literals, place them next to each other with no operator:

const char* cat = "Hello " "world";

To join two std::string objects, use operator+(std::string, std::string):

std::string hello("hello ");
std::string world("world\n");
std::sting cat = hello + world;

There is also an operator+ to join a string literal and a std::string:

std::string hello("hello ");
std::string cat = hello + "world\n";

There is no operator+ that takes std::string and int.

A solution to your problem is to use std::stringstream, which takes any operator<< that std::cout can take:

std::stringstream spath;
spath << "images/" << i << ".png";
std::string path = spath.str();
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technicially string literals will concatenate with std::string, and with each other (although with a different syntax). You should reword part 1. –  Mooing Duck May 29 '12 at 14:22
    
Thanks, @MooingDuck. I've updated my post. –  Robᵩ May 29 '12 at 14:36
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