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What's wrong with this piece of code:

#define str(x) #x
#define xstr(x) str(x)


typedef unsigned char   uint8_t;   
typedef enum
{

         RED = 0x64,
         GREEN = 0x65,
       /* other enum values */
         BLUE = 0x87

} Format;

char buffer[50];

/* other code and variables */

/* somewhere later in code */     

myformat = RED;
/* later calling format function */

MapFormattToString(myformat,&buffer);


void MapFormattToString(uint8_t format,char *buffer)
{    
    printf("format = %x\n",format);  /*format printf has output 64 */
    switch(format)
    {
    case RED:
        sprintf(buffer,"%s\n", xstr(RED));
        break;
    case GREEN:
        sprintf(buffer,"%s\n", xstr(GREEN));
        break;
    case BLUE:
        sprintf(buffer,"%s\n", xstr(BLUE));
        break;
    default:
        sprintf(buffer,"Unsupported color\n");
    }
}

If I step through this function with myformat = RED , it does not fall through any of the cases but instead falls through default in the switch case.
My objective is to that buffer should have RED in it instead of it's corresponding enum value i.e 64.

Compiler : gcc 3.4.5 on Windows XP

share|improve this question
9  
Try changing the function argument type to enum Format. An enum is not guaranteed to be uint8_t –  Mike Kwan May 29 '12 at 14:29
    
Some implementations define as __int8_t. –  Jack May 29 '12 at 14:49
    
Try to add printf("%08x %08x\n",format,A); to MapFormattToString. It will show you exactly what is being compared to what. I guess one of them will not be what you expect. –  ugoren May 29 '12 at 15:01
1  
How is buffer defined? &buffer suggest an error. –  Banthar May 29 '12 at 15:06
1  
@Banthar: No, &buffer is a pointer-to-array-of-char. The value should be the same as just buffer, but the types are different. –  jamesdlin May 30 '12 at 4:55

3 Answers 3

I just wrote the following program, compiled it, and tested it, and the output is:

$ ./test
    d
    e

$

which is exactly what you'd expect. Hope this helps you spot some difference in your program.

#include<stdio.h>

typedef unsigned char uint8_t;

typedef enum {
    RED = 0x64,
    GREEN = 0x65,
    BLUE = 0x87
} Format;

void MapFormatToString(uint8_t format, char *buffer) {
    switch (format) {
        case RED:
            sprintf(buffer, "%c\n", RED);
            break;
        case GREEN:
            sprintf(buffer, "%c\n", GREEN);
            break;
        case BLUE:
            sprintf(buffer, "%c\n", BLUE);
            break;
        default:
            sprintf(buffer, "Unknown\n");
    }

}

main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
    char buffer[100];

    MapFormatToString(RED, buffer);
    printf(buffer);
    MapFormatToString(GREEN, buffer);
    printf(buffer);
    MapFormatToString(BLUE, buffer);
    printf(buffer);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have added more info in my question –  user1377944 May 29 '12 at 18:37
    
Ok, I modified my C program as you indicated and made the changes here as well -- the results are exactly the same. Could you please make a little C program just like mine, compile and run it, and see if you get the same results? Maybe you're encountering some weird compiler error. I'm using gcc to compile mine. –  Jeremy Goodell May 29 '12 at 19:32

In MapFormatToString try printing the value inside format:

printf("%x", format);

If you don't get 64 (0x64, that is), it means something went wrong between the assignment to format and reading it inside MapFormatToString. For example, if an enum is treated as 32 bit integer, something might happen to it when converting uint8. Also, try not passing buffer at first, only print the value of format.

share|improve this answer
    
when I see value of format it is A (65) –  user1377944 May 29 '12 at 18:36

I copied-pasted your code. Just made a small change to the function call. It gives me output as desired.

Change: Instead of &buffer, pass buffer

//MapFormattToString(myformat,&buffer);
MapFormattToString(myformat, buffer);

Here is the main function for your reference:

int main()
{
char buffer[50];

/* other code and variables */

/* somewhere later in code */

Format myformat = BLUE;
/* later calling format function */

//MapFormattToString(myformat,&buffer);
MapFormattToString(myformat, buffer);


//  MapFormattToString(0x64, buffer);
  printf("\n***** Buffer = %s\n", buffer);
}

Compiler used: gcc (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.6.3-1ubuntu5) 4.6.3

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