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I'm trying to automatically instantiate the correct derived class based on the derived settings class.

Here I have the main base class along with a base settings class

public abstract class BaseClass
{
    public BaseClass() { }

    public abstract BaseClassSettings Write();
}

public class BaseClassSettings
{

}

Now here are my derive classes and their settings classes

public class DerivedFoo : BaseClass
{
    public DerivedFoo(DerivedFooSettings settings) 
    { 
         // Apply settings
    }

    public override BaseClassSettings Write()
    {
        DerivedFooSettings settings = new DerivedFooSettings();

        return settings;
    }
}

public class DerivedFooSettings : BaseClassSettings
{

}

public class DerivedBar : BaseClass
{
    public DerivedBar(DerivedBarSettings settings) 
    { 
         // Apply settings
    }

    public override BaseClassSettings Write()
    {
        DerivedBarSettings settings = new DerivedBarSettings();

        return settings;
    }
}

public class DerivedBarSettings : BaseClassSettings
{

}

I can save all the derived class settings in one array

DerivedFoo foo = new DerivedFoo();
DerivedBar bar = new DerivedBar();

BaseClassSettings[] s = new BaseClassSettings[2];
s[0] = foo.Write();
s[1] = bar.Write();

which serializes to disc in XML format.

How can I automatically instantiate the derived classes based on the derived settings classes?

So if the array element is a DerivedBarSettings class create a new instance of the DerivedBar class.

I would like to do this without using an ever increasing number of else if statements depending on the number of classes.

if (BaseClassSettings is DerivedFooSettings)
    new DerivedFoo(settings)
else if (BaseClassSettings is DerivedBarSettings) 
    new DerivedBar(settings)

How can this be done?

===============================================================================

[EDIT]

Here's what I am using:

[
    XmlInclude(typeof(DerivedSettingsClassA)),
    XmlInclude(typeof(DerivedSettingsClassB)),
    XmlInclude(typeof(DerivedSettingsClassC)),
    XmlInclude(typeof(DerivedSettingsClassD)),
    XmlInclude(typeof(DerivedSettingsClassE)),
]
public abstract class BaseSettingsClass
{
    public abstract DerivedClass Load(Game1 game, OutputDimensionSettings settings);
}

The only downside to this is that I have to explicitely define XmlInclude for all derived classes.

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2 Answers 2

Is this homework?

Here's one way (there are other possibilities):

public abstract class BaseClass
{ 
  public abstract BaseClassSettings Write(); 
} 

public abstract class BaseClassSettings
{
  public abstract BaseClass CreateCorrespondingInstance();
} 

Then:

public class DerivedFoo : BaseClass             
{             
  public DerivedFoo(DerivedFooSettings settings)              
  {              
    // Apply settings             
  }             

  public override BaseClassSettings Write()             
  {             
    DerivedFooSettings settings = new DerivedFooSettings();             
    return settings;             
  }             
}             

public class DerivedFooSettings : BaseClassSettings             
{             
  public override BaseClass CreateCorrespondingInstance()
  {
    return new DerivedFoo(this);
  }
}         

But it looks like you could benefit from generics!

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1  
I can assure you that this isn't homework (unless you count ongoing work towards an objective as homework, so maybe it is). I'm writing a prototype for my PhD project that isn't computer science based. I would like to learn how to utilize the benefits of generics in this case, can you (or others) help with that? –  user1423893 May 29 '12 at 16:13

I'm not sure generics are going to be of much help here. Generics are used to defer or constrain a type this is unknown until compile time. What you are doing is creating a relationship between unrelated types. This can be done with a custom attribute and some reflection.

First our custom attribute:

    [System.AttributeUsage(System.AttributeTargets.Class)]
    public class BaseClassLinkAttribute : System.Attribute
    {
        public System.Type LinkedType { get; set; }

        public BaseClassLinkAttribute(Type linkedType)
        {
            // Probably wat to make sure type is derrived from BaseClass
            LinkedType = linkedType;
        }
    }

Now we add a static method to our base class that creats an instance of the type in the custom attribute:

public abstract class BaseClass 
{ 
    public BaseClass() 
    { 
    } 

    public abstract BaseClassSettings Write();

    public static BaseClass CreateFromSettings(BaseClassSettings settings)
    {
        Attribute attr = Attribute.GetCustomAttribute(settings.GetType(), typeof(BaseClassLinkAttribute));

        // Check for null here and throw exception if attribute can't be found in prduction code

        BaseClassLinkAttribute linkAttribute = (BaseClassLinkAttribute)attr;

        // This is only going to work if class implements a constructor
        // that take a base settings class

        return (BaseClass)Activator.CreateInstance(linkAttribute.LinkedType,settings);
    }
}

Now all we have to do is mark the settings class with the attribute of the class we want it to create.

[BaseClassLink(typeof(DerivedFoo))]
public class DerivedFooSettings : BaseClassSettings
{
}

So given a settings class, we can now create the assocated class:

       DerivedFooSettings x = new DerivedFooSettings();

       BaseClass y = BaseClass.CreateFromSettings(x);

       Console.WriteLine(y.GetType().FullName);

Which will give you the output of Namespace.DerivedFoo.

Of course there are some limitations here, the derrived class must implement a constructor that takes settings class or activiation will fail. I think we some work you might be able to get rid of the attrbiute and pass the type in with a generic. However, you will still have to create a link between the types.

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I like your idea and I couldn't see the need to use generics. I've rolled my own generation based on a combination of Jeppe's answer but I will study yours to see if it brings anything new. –  user1423893 May 29 '12 at 21:24

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