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Why I can do this...

for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
{
   // do work here

   ProgressBar.Value = i;
}

... but I cannot do this?

object theLock = new object();

Parallel.For(0, 100, delegate(int i)
{
   // do work here

   lock(theLock)
   {
      Invoke((Action) delegate
         {
            ProgressBar.Value = i;
         });
   }
});

Using BeginInvoke() the progress bar update is delayed to the end of the Parallel.For() loop. This is the reason way I was trying to use Invoke().

I have already considered incapsulating everything inside the Task task = Task.Factory.StartNew(delegate but stopping a Parallel.For() inside a Task is not that easy.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean, stopping Parallel.For() in a Task is not easy? Could you clarify that? –  svick May 29 '12 at 16:29
    
You need to stop the Parallel.For() inside the Task when the App is already closed and many BeginInvoke() need still to be processed and the ProgressBar control does not exist anymore. –  Alberto May 29 '12 at 17:20

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