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I am doing this:

    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var dict1 = new Dictionary<int, string>();
        var dict2 = new Dictionary<int, string>();
        DateTime t1 = DateTime.Now;
        for (int i = 1; i < 1000000; i++)
        {
            Parallel.Invoke(() => dict1.Add(i, "Test" + i), () => dict2.Add(i, "Test" + i));
        }
        TimeSpan t2 = DateTime.Now.Subtract(t1);

        Console.WriteLine(t2.TotalMilliseconds);

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

So doing a for loop 1 million time and adding items to two different dictionaries. The problem is that it takes 11 secs which is more than 5 time the normal sequential method (without tasks/threads) which takes only 2 sec. Don't know why.

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3  
Are you sure this is doing what you want it to? This only does 2 parallel operations 1000000 times. Are you sure you don't want the loop inside of your Invoke call? –  Colin D May 29 '12 at 15:48
3  
Unrelated, but Stopwatch is a little nicer for timing like this. –  James Manning May 29 '12 at 16:02
    
Ok, what I am doing here is to test performance of populating multiple dictionaries at the same time. My real case would be load all entities from database and populate multiple dictionaries based on some Key fields, then cache those dictionaries. –  Luka May 29 '12 at 18:41
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Like others have said or implied, parallel code is not always faster due to the overhead of parallelization.

That being said, your code is adding an item to 2 dictionaries in parallel 1M times while you should be adding 1M items to 2 dictionaries in parallel. The difference is subtle but the end result is code that is ~10% faster (on my machine) than your sequential case.

Parallel.Invoke(() => FillDictionary(dict1, 1000000), () => FillDictionary(dict2, 1000000));

...

private static void FillDictionary(Dictionary<int, string> toFill, int itemCount)
{
    for(int i = 0 ; i < itemCount; i++)
        toFill.Add(i, "test" + i);
}
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There is certain overhead using parallel invocation and benefit of distributing work across multiple cores/CPUs. In this case overhead is bigger than the actual benefit from distribution of useful work, so that's why you see significant difference. Try using more heavy operations and you will see the difference.

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1  
Additionally, Parallel.Invoke doesn't return until all tasks have been completed. In this case, OP is making two calls instead of one in the same loop, thus doubling the amount of work and therefore time to complete. –  scottm May 29 '12 at 15:44
    
I have no heavy operations, just adding item to the dictionares –  Luka May 29 '12 at 18:41
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Rewrite that to something like:

Parallel.Invoke(
    () =>
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        {
            dict1.Add(i, "Test" + i);
        }
    },
    () =>
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        {
            dict2.Add(i, "Test" + i);
        }
    }
);

That should be a lot faster because the two threads are initialized exactly once and then run to completion. In your version you are calling each lambda expression 1000000 times, each time waiting for both to finish before continuing.

Parallel.Invoke is really meant to be used for longer running operations. Otherwise the overhead of setting up the parallel tasks and waiting for them all to finish just kills any performance gained by running the tasks in parallel.

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Parallel.Invoke means "perform all these tasks and wait until they are done." In this case, you are only ever doing two tasks in parallel. Thus the overhead of parallel invocation is greater than the potential gains from concurrency.

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If what you want to do is add 100000 items to two different dictionaries, you should break the work load between tasks, not the method. This method does the same as your code, but on my machine is much faster than your implementation:

var dict1 = new ConcurrentDictionary<int, string>();
    var dict2 = new ConcurrentDictionary<int, string>();

    Parallel.Invoke(() =>
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < 500000; i++)
        {
            dict1[i] = "Test" +i;
            dict2[i] ="Test" +i;
        }
    },
    () =>
    {
        for(int i = 500000; i < 1000000; i++)
        {
            dict1[i] ="Test" +i;
            dict2[i] = "Test" +i;
        }
    });
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This method also isn't thread-safe. You can't modify one dictionary from two threads at the same time. –  svick May 29 '12 at 16:21
    
@svick I wasn't trying to be thread safe in this instance. You can use a ConcurrentDictionary for thread safety (I modified my example). –  scottm May 29 '12 at 16:25
1  
@scottm: ConcurrentDictionary doesn't have an Add method... –  Austin Salonen May 29 '12 at 16:26
    
@scottm, you weren't trying to be thread-safe? That's like saying you weren't trying to write correct code, I think that's a terrible thing to do to others. –  svick May 29 '12 at 16:28
2  
@svick point taken, however the question was about parallel execution and not thread safety. –  scottm May 29 '12 at 16:30
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