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I have data (below) with three different delimiters (the first has a space to the number, the second 3 spaces to the number and the final column a space and then a tab to the number) and I want to be able to generate a list containing sequential values from each column.

 8000.5   16745     0.1257
 8001.0   16745     0.1242
 8001.5   16745     0.1565
 8002.0   16745     0.1595
 8002.5   16745     0.1093
 8003.0   16745     0.1644

I tried some stuff with re. after converting to a string to see if I could parse it this way but it seemed a little bit long-winded to convert and I was wondering if anyone knew a quicker way. Ideal output would be

list 1 = [8000.5, 8001.0, 8001.5 ...]
list 2 = [16745, 16745, 16745, ...]
list 3 = [0.1257, 0.1242, 0.1565, ...]

Thanks!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just use a .split(); it'll take any amount of whitespace and split on that (ignoring leading and trailing whitespace altogether):

>>> ex = ' 8000.5   16745     0.1257'
>>> ex.split()
['8000.5', '16745', '0.1257']

If you need floats instead of strings, simply apply float() to each value using map:

>>> ex = ' 8000.5   16745     0.1257'
>>> map(float, ex.split())
[8000.5, 16745.0, 0.1257]
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1  
Is strip actually necessary? I think just using split should take care of it. –  mgilson May 29 '12 at 16:26
    
Any better idea on how to get the list of column? –  Mayli May 29 '12 at 16:26
    
@mgilson: heh, if you split on other values leading items are included in the split (e.g. '/one/two'.split('/') > ['', 'one', 'two']. But without an argument, indeed, the strip is not needed. –  Martijn Pieters May 29 '12 at 16:30
    
@Mayli: better how? Not sure what you mean. –  Martijn Pieters May 29 '12 at 16:31
    
Yeah, I was surprised when you said that since it goes against the documented behavior for python 2.7 -- I was wondering if this had been changed in python 3k but (thankfully) I don't think it has changed. –  mgilson May 29 '12 at 16:32

use split()

strs = """ 8000.5   16745     0.1257
 8001.0   16745     0.1242
 8001.5   16745     0.1565
 8002.0   16745     0.1595
 8002.5   16745     0.1093
 8003.0   16745     0.1644"""

list_col= map(list,zip(*(map(float,x.split()) for x in strs.split('\n'))))

print(list(list_col))

output: list of list of columns

[[8000.5, 8001.0, 8001.5, 8002.0, 8002.5, 8003.0], [16745.0, 16745.0, 16745.0, 16745.0, 16745.0, 16745.0], [0.1257, 0.1242, 0.1565, 0.1595, 0.1093, 0.1644]]
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txt = """ 8000.5   16745     0.1257
 8001.0   16745     0.1242
 8001.5   16745     0.1565
 8002.0   16745     0.1595
 8002.5   16745     0.1093
 8003.0   16745     0.1644 """

data = zip(*((float(s) for s in row.split()) for row in txt.split('\n')))

results in

[(8000.5, 8001.0, 8001.5, 8002.0, 8002.5, 8003.0),
 (16745.0, 16745.0, 16745.0, 16745.0, 16745.0, 16745.0),
 (0.1257, 0.1242, 0.1565, 0.1595, 0.1093, 0.1644)]
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use map() instead of two for loops. –  Ashwini Chaudhary May 29 '12 at 16:41
    
@AshwiniChaudhary: I think if you look carefully, you will find our answers do the same amount of work in the same order; the only difference is, I find mine easier to read. –  Hugh Bothwell May 29 '12 at 16:47

Yet another way to do it (s is the initial string):

>>> [map(float, col) for col in zip(*map(str.split, s.splitlines()))]
[[8000.5, 8001.0, 8001.5, 8002.0, 8002.5, 8003.0],
 [16745.0, 16745.0, 16745.0, 16745.0, 16745.0, 16745.0],
 [0.1257, 0.1242, 0.1565, 0.1595, 0.1093, 0.1644]]
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