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I have some HTML that a 3rd party API builds, so I have no control of the output. The only thing I can change is the CSS. I would prefer not to use JavaScript, if possible.

What I'm trying to do is swap 2 elements using float:left on the second, so it's displayed before the first one. This works well on modern browsers, but causes the "swapped" element to move to the second line on older IE browsers (specifically 6 and 7, and IE in compatibility mode).

jsFiddle Example

HTML (cannot change)

<div class="wrapper">
    <a class="page">Page: &nbsp;</a>
    <a class="previous">Prev</a>
    <span>
        <a>1</a>
        <a>2</a>
    </span>
    <a class="next">Next</a>
</div>​

CSS

.wrapper{
    line-height:36px;
}
.wrapper span, .page{
    float:left;
}
.wrapper span a, .page{
    display:inline-block;
}
.wrapper span a{
    width:20px; 
}
.previous, .next{
    width:30px;
    display:inline-block;
}

Modern Browser Screenshot

Modern Browser Screenshot

Internet Explorer Screenshot

Internet Explorer Screenshot

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The issue turned out to be a bug with how IE6 and IE7 (not present in IE8) handle float:right; within a left-aligned element. Instead of simply positioning the element on the closest point to the left, past any content (as modern browsers do), IE6 and IE7 position the element in the farthest right point possible (which, isn't that much different in terms of definition, but makes a huge difference in cases like this).

Anyway, to get past this limitation, float:right; could not be used as a solution. As there was no way of knowing (without JavaScript, which the OP stated should not be used) what the width of .content span was (variable number of pages), a static width could not be used on .wrapper. Instead, the "Next" and "Prev" link elements had to be "discarded" until the end, then positioned absolutely (relative to .wrapper) after the width of .wrapper had been figured out.

jsFiddle Example

The Magical CSS

.wrapper {
    float:left; /* Can be 'display:inline;' instead, but this makes it possible to treat this as "block" */
    clear:left; /* Can be discarded if 'float:left;' isn't used */
    position:relative; /* Keeps 'next'/'prev' contained */
}
.page, span {
    float:left; /* Positions 'Page:' and page numbers on left */
}
.page, span a {
    padding-right:.5em; /* Can change this to whatever */
}
.previous {
    position:absolute;
    right:-6em; /* Width (including padding, borders, etc) of .previous and .next */
    width:2.5em;
    padding-right:.5em;
}
.next {
    position:absolute;
    right:-3em; /* Width (including padding, borders, etc) of .next */
    width:2.5em;
    padding-right:.5em;
}
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1  
+1 Magical it is! Fantastic help, Thank you ever so much! Small detail: you might want to edit the CSS to put right:-6em for .next and right:-3em for .prev or else next is before prev –  Johann May 30 '12 at 8:21

Which version of IE is the 'older IE version', specifically? If it's IE6, bfrohs is right that inline-block could be messing you up. I messed around with your fiddle, and came up with this:

http://jsfiddle.net/chippper/5rzVQ/15/

CSS:

.wrapper{
    line-height:36px;
}
.wrapper span, .page{
    float:left;
    display: inline;
}

.wrapper span a{
    width:20px; 
    float:left;
    display: block;
}
.previous, .next{
    width:30px;
}

Which seems to achieve the effect you're after. I haven't checked in IE, but it doesn't use inline-block, so there is a better chance that it will work.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, but unfortunately, it's the same as before. By older IE I mean IE6 and IE7 (or IE 9 in compatibility mode) which I have to be compatible with :-( –  Johann May 29 '12 at 17:38
    
@Johann, what other styles are being applied to those elements? (From other stylesheets.) –  bfrohs May 29 '12 at 17:46
    
@bfrohs no other. I control the styling 100% –  Johann May 29 '12 at 17:48
    
@Johann, try the jsFiddle example in my answer (at end). –  bfrohs May 29 '12 at 17:55

The problem you have is the display:inline-block;.

IE6/7 has a known issue with this display type, in that it doesn't work if the element's default display type is block (ie as it is in your case, since you're applying it to a <div> element).

The work-around for this is to use display:inline; instead. This work-around takes advantage of the fact that IE6/7 also have bugs with the inline display type, which mean that it can be used in place of inline-block in some cases.

Obviously you don't want it to take the inline style for other browsers, so you'll need to use a CSS hack, conditional comments, or some other way of applying the style differently specific for IE6/7.

Hope that helps.

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Using tag names as CSS selectors won't work properly in older versions of IE. Using an id or class name as css selectors , should work for you.

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1  
Tag names as selectors works perfectly fine in IE. –  bfrohs May 29 '12 at 17:09

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