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I have two HTML input boxes, that need to calculate the time difference in JavaScript onBlur (since I need it in real time) and insert the result to new input box.

Format example: 10:00 & 12:30 need to give me: 02:30

Thanks!

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Are you using Java, JScript, or Javascript? They're all different languages. –  Paulpro May 29 '12 at 17:42
2  
javascript is NOT a scripting language of java! –  gdoron May 29 '12 at 17:42
    
Are they actual dates in the text box? Can you post the HTML and some sample data? –  mattytommo May 29 '12 at 17:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Here is one possible solution:

function diff(start, end) {
    start = start.split(":");
    end = end.split(":");
    var startDate = new Date(0, 0, 0, start[0], start[1], 0);
    var endDate = new Date(0, 0, 0, end[0], end[1], 0);
    var diff = endDate.getTime() - startDate.getTime();
    var hours = Math.floor(diff / 1000 / 60 / 60);
    diff -= hours * 1000 * 60 * 60;
    var minutes = Math.floor(diff / 1000 / 60);

    // If using time pickers with 24 hours format, add the below line get exact hours
    if (hours < 0)
       hours = hours + 24;

    return (hours <= 9 ? "0" : "") + hours + ":" + (minutes <= 9 ? "0" : "") + minutes;
}

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/KQQqp/

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Thanks alot !!! –  user1424332 May 29 '12 at 20:20
    
I want to show the seconds here. How can I do here? –  Chinu Jun 4 at 13:52

Well this work almost great. Now use this code to calculate: 23:50 - 00:10 And see what you get.Or even 23:30 - 01:30. That's a mess. Because getting the answer the other way in php is:

$date1 = strtotime($_POST['started']);
$date2 = strtotime($_POST['ended']);
$interval = $date2 - $date1;
$playedtime = $interval / 60;

But still, it works like yours. I guess have to bring in the dates aswell?

And again: My hard research and development helped me.

if (isset($_POST['calculate'])) {
$d1 = $_POST['started'];
$d2 = $_POST['ended'];
if ($d2 < $d1) {
    $date22 = date('Y-m-');
    $date222 = date('d')-1;
    $date2 = $date22."".$date222;
} else {
$date2 = date('Y-m-d');
}
$date1 = date('Y-m-d');
$start_time = strtotime($date2.' '.$d1);
$end_time = strtotime($date1.' '.$d2); // or use date('Y-m-d H:i:s') for current time
$playedtime = round(abs($start_time - $end_time) / 60,2);
}

And that's how you calculate time over to the next day. //edit. First i had date1 jnd date2 switched. I need to -1 because this calculation only comes on next day and the first date vas yesterday.

After improving and a lot of brain power with my friend we came up to this:

$begin=mktime(substr($_GET["start"], 0,2),substr($_GET["start"], 2,2),0,1,2,2003);
$end=mktime(substr($_GET["end"], 0,2),substr($_GET["end"], 2,2),0,1,3,2003);
$outcome=($end-$begin)-date("Z");
$minutes=date("i",$outcome)+date("H",$outcome)*60; //Echo minutes only
$hours = date("H:i", $outcome); //Echo time in hours + minutes like 01:10 or something.

So you actually need only 4 lines of code to get your result. You can take only minutes or show full time (like difference is 02:32) 2 hours and 32 minutes. What's most important: Still you can calculate overnight in 24 hour clock aka: Start time 11:50PM to let's say 01:00 AM (in 24 hour clock 23:50 - 01:00) because in 12 hour mode it works anyway.

What's most important: You don't have to format your input. You can use just plain 2300 as 23:00 input. This script will convert text field input to correct format by itself. Last script uses standard html form with method="get" but you can convert it to use POST method as well.

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Try This

var dif = ( new Date("1970-1-1 " + end-time) - new Date("1970-1-1 " + start-time) ) / 1000 / 60 / 60;
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