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The program should get arguments from a command line, and add the arguments via posix threads. But Xcode successfully builds it, but gives no output. Is there something wrong with this code. Thanks

#include <iostream>
#include <pthread.h>

using namespace std;

void *Add(void *threadid){
  long tid;
  tid =(long)threadid;
  long sum=0;
  sum=sum+tid;
  printf("%ld.\n",sum);
  pthread_exit(NULL);
}    

void *Print(void *threadid){
  long tid;
  tid =(long)threadid;

  printf("%ld.\n",tid);
  pthread_exit(NULL);
}   

int main (int argc, char const *argv[])
{
  if(argc<6){
    printf("you need more arguments");
    return -1;
  }

  long real[5];
  pthread_t athread,bthread;

  for (int x=1;x<=5;x++)
    real[x-1]=atol(argv[x]);

  for(int y=1;y<=5;y++)
    pthread_create(athread[y],NULL,Add,(void *)&real[y]);

  for(int y=1;y<=5;y++)
    pthread_create(bthread[y],NULL,Print,(void *)&real[y]);

  pthread_exit(NULL);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
This question is indecipherable. "add the arguments in a posix"? "Xcode gives no output, address" Output/address for what? What's 'dbll'? As for the code, obviously not even the first thing has been done to get the code to run. #include iostream doesn't even include the required brackets or quotes. –  bames53 May 29 '12 at 18:12
    
sorry , I forgot the brackets when posting. They're in the real code –  user1424263 May 29 '12 at 18:19
    
Okay, that's good but it's the least of the problems here. You can edit your question to improve it. If you make it more clear what you're asking then you'll be more likely to get useful answers. –  bames53 May 29 '12 at 18:23

2 Answers 2

First of all I think you should check if pthread_create method was success. I don't have expirience in pthread under Apple, but based on that code I think you have problem with thread creation.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - don't omit error checking! –  Jonathan Wakely May 29 '12 at 18:54
    
Yeah, you code still barfs, athread and bthread are not arrays. Make sure you have your Xcode console open, heck open your debugger too. –  jnbbender May 29 '12 at 21:09

First of all, printf is defined in stdio.h and not in iostream. If you'd like to do it the C++ way with iostream, then cout << "Blabla " << var << endl; should be used instead.

Second, you are calling pthread_create with wrong arguments. As defined athread and bthread are not arrays but you use them as such. I am not entirely sure why this would even compile since pthread_create expects pthread_t* as first argument and you are providing *pthread_t. If the code ever compiles, it will most likely crash when run.

Third, you are not joining the adder threads. This means that your print threads could start before the adder threads have finished.

Fourth, you are summing into local variables. You are supposed to sum into a global one. Don't forget to guard the access to it by a mutex or something.

Fifth, arguments to the thread routines are wrong. You are passing pointer to the value and not the value itself and later reinterpreting the pointer as the value itself. You would most likely want to use (void *)real[y] and not (void *)&real[y]. Mind that casting long to void * doesn't work on all systems. On Mac OS X both long and void * are of the same length (either 32 or 64 bits) but this is not true in general.

Edited: Your code doesn't even compile on OS X:

$ g++ -o t.x t.cpp
t.cpp: In function ‘int main(int, const char**)’:
t.cpp:37: error: cannot convert ‘_opaque_pthread_t’ to ‘_opaque_pthread_t**’ for argument ‘1’ to ‘int pthread_create(_opaque_pthread_t**, const pthread_attr_t*, void* (*)(void*), void*)’
t.cpp:40: error: cannot convert ‘_opaque_pthread_t’ to ‘_opaque_pthread_t**’ for argument ‘1’ to ‘int pthread_create(_opaque_pthread_t**, const pthread_attr_t*, void* (*)(void*), void*)’

$ clang -o t.x t.cpp
t.cpp:37:5: error: no matching function for call to 'pthread_create'
    pthread_create(athread[y],NULL,Add,(void *)&real[y]);
    ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~
/usr/include/pthread.h:304:11: note: candidate function not viable: no known
      conversion from 'struct _opaque_pthread_t' to 'pthread_t *' (aka
      '_opaque_pthread_t **') for 1st argument;
int       pthread_create(pthread_t * __restrict,
          ^
t.cpp:40:5: error: no matching function for call to 'pthread_create'
    pthread_create(bthread[y],NULL,Print,(void *)&real[y]);
    ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~
/usr/include/pthread.h:304:11: note: candidate function not viable: no known
      conversion from 'struct _opaque_pthread_t' to 'pthread_t *' (aka
      '_opaque_pthread_t **') for 1st argument;
int       pthread_create(pthread_t * __restrict,
          ^
2 errors generated.

Don't you even see the error messages that XCode is providing?

share|improve this answer
    
not only can the print threads begin before the addition threads (I can't tell if that's a real problem since I don't know what the program is supposed to be doing), but the program can exit before the print threads start, thus leading to the possibility that nothing will be printed. –  bames53 May 29 '12 at 21:19
    
Well, the process is not supposed to exit until all of its threads have finished, but the arguments to the thread routines are located on the stack of the main thread and bad things can happen if (or when) it jumps out of main(). –  Hristo Iliev May 29 '12 at 21:30
    
That depends on the threading library/language. For example a Java process continues after the main function returns until all user threads have completed. However in pthreads, std::threads, etc. the process exits after the main function returns, and any other threads that are still running are simply terminated. –  bames53 May 29 '12 at 22:01
    
This is only true if one does not explicitly call pthread_exit() in the main thread which is not the case with this code. Calling pthread_exit() from the main thread blocks until all other threads have exited. Still this code doesn't compile at all, hence it doesn't run at all, hence no output :) –  Hristo Iliev May 29 '12 at 22:10
    
Ah, you are right. I missed that in the documentation of pthread_exit(). –  bames53 May 29 '12 at 22:13

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