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So I'm fairly new to objective-c and am trying to wrap my head around protocols. I'll use an example to illustrate my question.

Suppose I have a "Calculate" class that performs various methods. I also have "Class1" and "Class2" that perform the same methods in "Calculate".

Now from my understanding I can use protocols to access methods from "Calculate" without the need for inheritance (Therefore saving the need to replicate the same code in Class1 and Class2).

My understanding is also that I have to implement the protocols in Class1 and Class2, therefore I'd have to type out those methods anyways. So whats the point of protocols?

I want to use the methods of "Calculate" without making it a superclass of Class1 and Class2. So I started exploring protocols, I've read the documentation but I still don't understand how this is being achieved. If some one can explain protocols in layman's it would be appreciated.

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1  
Are you familiar with other programming languages and their use of Interfaces? –  Stefan H May 29 '12 at 17:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Inheritance would allow you to not have to duplicate code. Protocols (what other programming languages call interfaces) implement a Can-Do structure of OOP. Meaning when a class implements a protocol, that class is saying that it can do a certain set of methods. It is still up to that class to implement the method as they see fit.

Here is a developer reference from Apple:

https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/ObjectiveC/Chapters/ocProtocols.html

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A protocol is a set of method declarations. It's main purpose is to allow flexible relationships between classes.

Let's say I want a variety of classes to send out logging messages but I don't want them responsible for knowing what happens to the messages after they're sent. I create a Logger protocol that is then implemented by a ConsoleWriter class and a DiskWriter class. The class wanting to send the message doesn't know or care which one it's talking to; it just talks to something it knows as id<Logger>.

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I don't know with what types of languages you have experience. But an Object-C protocol is very much like an Interface in .NET. It's purpose is to define a contract (interface, footprint, etc.) so that the actual "Type" of the object is not necessary to be known, but just what it can do.

That being said you can define a protocol "MyProtocol.h" that has a few properties and methods. Then you can implement this protocol on a class. You will not need to add the members of the protocol in the header of the class, but simply need to write the concrete implementation in the implementation.

What this does is allow you to reference object by their defined interface and not their type. So you can use the id type instead of the actual class type.

Hope this helps.

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Protocols are almost like a portable header file. They describe methods that can or should be implemented by any class that conforms to the protocol. This is different from inheritance where a subclass automatically implements the methods of its super class and those methods can optionally be overridden on a subclass by subclass basis.

I suspect that you have some OOP background so I won't go too much into subclassing other than to say a subclass is very often a specialized or more specific version of the super class. In other words: every subclass is a kind of its superclass, but every superclass is not necessarily a type of subclass.

Protocols in ObjC are often used in delegate patterns where ClassA needs to know that ClassB can perform some kind of action. Here's an example:

// ClassA.h
#import "ClassB.h"

@interface ClassA <ClassBProtocol>
// Some variables
@end

// ClassA.m
@implementation ClassA
- (id)init {
    if ( (self = [super init]) ) {
        ClassB *classB = [[ClassB alloc] init]; // Create an instance of ClassB
        classB.delegate = self; // Set ourself as the delegate which means we want ClassB to tell us what to do
    }
    return self;
}

// Introduced by ClassBProtocol
- (void)doSomethingCoolWithString:(NSString *)string {
    // Do something here, it's up to ClassA what to do
}
@end


// ClassB.h
@protocol ClassBProtocol <NSObject>
- (void)doSomethingCoolWithString:(NSString *)string;
@end


@interface ClassB
@property (nonatomic, weak) id <ClassBProtocol>delegate;
// Some variables
@end


//ClassB.m
@implementation ClassB
@synthesize delegate;

- (id)init {
    if ( (self = [super init]) ) {
        if (delegate && [delegate respondsToSelector:@selector(doSomethingCoolWithString:)]) {
            [delegate doSomethingCoolWithString:@"A String"];
        }
    }
    return self;
}
@end
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Below Example for Simple Protocol & Property:

---> ViewController.h File

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
#import "MyVC.h"

@interface ViewController : UIViewController<MyVCProtocol>
{
    IBOutlet UILabel *label;
    IBOutlet UIButton *btnPush;
    MyVC *vc;
}
-(IBAction)Buttonclicked;
@end

---> ViewController.m File

#import "ViewController.h"

@implementation ViewController

- (void)didReceiveMemoryWarning
{
    [super didReceiveMemoryWarning];
}

#pragma mark - View lifecycle

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];
}

-(IBAction)Buttonclicked
{
    vc = [[MyVC alloc]initWithNibName:@"MyVC" bundle:nil];
    vc.delegate=self;
    [self.navigationController pushViewController:vc animated:YES];
}

-(void)GetText:(NSString *)text
{
    label.textAlignment=UITextAlignmentCenter;
    label.text=text;
}

- (void)viewDidUnload
{
    [super viewDidUnload];
}

- (BOOL)shouldAutorotateToInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)interfaceOrientation
{
    return (interfaceOrientation != UIInterfaceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown);
}

@end

---> MyVC.h File

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

@protocol MyVCProtocol <NSObject>

-(void)GetText:(NSString *)text;

@end

@interface MyVC : UIViewController
{
    IBOutlet UITextField *m_TextField;
    IBOutlet UIButton *m_Button;
    id <MyVCProtocol> delegate;
}
@property(nonatomic, retain)id <MyVCProtocol> delegate;
-(IBAction)ButtonClicked;
@end

---> MyVC.m File

#import "MyVC.h"

@implementation MyVC
@synthesize delegate;

- (id)initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibNameOrNil bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundleOrNil
{
    self = [super initWithNibName:nibNameOrNil bundle:nibBundleOrNil];
    if (self) {
        // Custom initialization
    }
    return self;
}

- (void)didReceiveMemoryWarning
{
    [super didReceiveMemoryWarning];
}

#pragma mark - View lifecycle

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];
}

-(IBAction)ButtonClicked
{
    [delegate GetText:m_TextField.text];
    [self.navigationController popViewControllerAnimated:YES];
}

- (BOOL)textFieldShouldReturn:(UITextField *)textField
{
    [textField resignFirstResponder];
    return YES;
}

- (void)viewDidUnload
{
    [super viewDidUnload];
}

- (BOOL)shouldAutorotateToInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)interfaceOrientation
{
    return (interfaceOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationPortrait);
}

@end
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