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I have just written a program which reverses a sentence whatever the user gives. For example: if the user enters "How are you", my program generates "uoy era woH".

The programme which I wrote is shown below. I just have a wild intution that there can be a smarter program than this. So valuable input from your side is most appreciated or any better program than this is also most welcome.

int ReverseString(char *);
main() {
  char *Str;
  printf("enter any string\n");
  gets(Str);
  ReverseString(Str);
  getch();
}
int ReverseString(char *rev) {
  int len = 0;
  char p;
  while(*rev!='\0') {
    len++;
    rev++;
  }
  rev--;
  while(len>0) {
    p = *rev;
    putchar(p);
    rev--;
    len--;
  }
}

Thanks a lot.

share|improve this question
2  
BUFFER OVERFLOW! –  Tom Jul 3 '09 at 18:47
    
Can you please make it more clear?? –  Maddy Jul 3 '09 at 18:48
    
@GNR Which C text book are you learning from? Learing how to read a string into a buffer should be one of the first things a good textbook teaches you. –  anon Jul 3 '09 at 18:54
    
Don't do "printf("enter any string\n");", as this can be exploited in a format string attack. –  tr9sh Jul 3 '09 at 18:56
1  
@John Kugelman: I stand corrected, sorry –  tr9sh Jul 3 '09 at 19:02
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9 Answers

You could use recursion.

int ReverseString(char *rev) {
  if(*rev!='\0') {
    ReverseString(rev + 1);
    putchar(*rev);
  }
  return 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
devinb,Thats really a beautifull code.Thanks a lot –  Maddy Jul 3 '09 at 19:06
5  
It's nice, and is the cleanest way I know to reverse a linked list - a common interview question, it seems. An iterative approach is probably better for strings, however. –  anon Jul 3 '09 at 19:15
    
There are ways to change it so that you can reverse the string itself, rather than just outputting, but it's not quite as pretty =P –  DevinB Jul 3 '09 at 19:25
add comment
void ReverseString( char* str, int len ) {
  if( len > 1 ) {
    swap( &str[0], &str[len - 1] );
    ReverseString( ++str, len - 2 );
  }
}

Or, unrolling the tail-recursion:

void ReverseString( char* str, int len ) {
  while( len > 1 ) {
    swap( &str[0], &str[len - 1] );
    ++str;
    len -= 2;
  }
}

Where swap is defined as:

void swap( char* a, char* b ) {
  *a ^= *b;
  *b ^= *a;
  *a ^= *b;
}

If you use this though, your TA's will definitely know you didn't figure this out yourself :)

share|improve this answer
    
that std::swap is probably much for a C begginer. –  Tom Jul 3 '09 at 19:12
    
Not Sure/Tom,any idea about the std::swap.Just couldnt get any idea abt it.. –  Maddy Jul 3 '09 at 19:18
    
Especially as it is C++, not C. –  anon Jul 3 '09 at 19:18
    
There, defined swap :) –  Not Sure Jul 3 '09 at 19:21
2  
@NotSure, that 3-step XOR is a fancy overkill. It would be better to keep a local (stack) variable and swap through it right in the ReverseString while() loop or if() block for the two schemes. –  nik Jul 4 '09 at 4:56
show 4 more comments

Okay, here is my function. I wrote it a while ago, just for practice.

char* reverse(char *string){

    int length = 0;
    int half = 0;

    length = strlen(string);
    half = (length/2) - 1;
    --length;

    int i = 0;
    register char interim;
    for(; i<=half; ++i){
        interim = string[i];
        string[i] = string[length - i];
        string[length - i] = interim;
    }

    return string;

}

now that I look at it, I'm less proud of it than when I got it to work. I'm just posting it because you asked me to post it when I found it--and for completeness' sake.

After looking at some other answers I realize that the calculation of half the string is unnecessary and I could have just decremented length until i and length were equal. Oh well--here it is.

Also, please don't bash me for the use of the register keyword :P

share|improve this answer
    
also 'strlen' is an 'O(n)' operation, so there's still two loops in your code, one of them is just hidden. –  DevinB Jul 3 '09 at 19:40
    
I originally had my own length calculation in there but changed it to strlen because the reversal was the point of the code. But really, the length has to be known anyway, whether it's calculated before or after the function is called. –  Carson Myers Jul 3 '09 at 19:43
    
Thnaks a lot carson. –  Maddy Jul 5 '09 at 15:55
add comment

Yet another variation...

void ReverseString( char *str, int len ) {
  int i;
  for(i=0; i < len/2; i++) {
    swap( &str[i], &str[len -1 -i] );
  }
}
void swap( char *a, char *b ) {
  char tmp = *a;
  *a = *b;
  *b = tmp;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
void revstr(TCHAR *str) {
  if( *str == '\0' ) {
    return;
  }
  TCHAR *start = str;
  TCHAR *end = start + strlen(str) - 1;
  while(start < end) {
    *start ^= *end;
    *end ^= *start;
    *start ^= *end;
    *start++;
    *end-–;
    /*
      could also use *start ^= *end ^= *start++ ^= *end–-; if you want to get fancy
    */
  }
}

Stolen from the 2005 version of myself, but screw that guy, he slept with my wife. Yes, I know I don't need some of the '*'s, but I wrote the one-liner first and just converted it, and the one-liner does require them.

share|improve this answer
    
Chris,Thanks a lot –  Maddy Jul 5 '09 at 16:14
add comment

The following program prints its arguments in reverse character order:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

char * reverse(char * string) {
  char * a = string;
  char * b = string + strlen(string) - 1;
  for(; a < b; ++a, --b)
    *a ^= *b, *b ^= *a, *a ^= *b; // swap *a <-> *b
  return string;
}

int main(int argc, char * argv[]) {
  for(int i = 1; i < argc; ++i)
    puts(reverse(argv[i]));
}

Nothing new here, but IMO more readable than most other answers.

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add comment

If you don't know the length of the string:

void reverse_string(char* str) {
  char* p2 = str;
  while (*p2 != '\0') {
    /* assumes the string is null-terminated, will fail otherwise */
    ++p2;
  }
  --p2;
  char* p1 = str;
  while (p1 < p2) {
    char tmp = *p1;
    *p1 = *p2;
    *p2 = tmp;
    ++p1;
    --p2;
  }
}

If you do:

void reverse_string(char* str, const size_t len) {
  if (len <= 1) {
    return;
  }
  char* p2 = str + len - 1;
  char* p1 = str;
  while (p1 < p2) {
    char tmp = *p1;
    *p1 = *p2;
    *p2 = tmp;
    ++p1;
    --p2;
  } 
}
share|improve this answer
    
know what I love about while loops? That first one you have there, with the comment in it, can also be written as just while(*p2++); –  Carson Myers Jul 3 '09 at 19:34
    
also, p1 and p2 both just point to str (you haven't copied the string to new locations, so you're just working on the same string with two variables). Really, you could replace every occurrence of *p1 and *p2 with *str. –  Carson Myers Jul 3 '09 at 19:36
    
"That first one you have there, with the comment in it, can also be written as just while(*p2++);" -- too terse IMHO; I wouldn't put it in production code, neither in an example for a C beginner –  quant_dev Jul 3 '09 at 19:46
1  
"also, p1 and p2 both just point to str (you haven't copied the string to new locations, so you're just working on the same string with two variables). Really, you could replace every occurrence of *p1 and *p2 with *str." -- not true, they point to different places in the string. –  quant_dev Jul 3 '09 at 19:46
add comment

This won't work. Should allocate memory for your sentence.

char *Str;
printf("enter any string\n");
gets(Str);

should be:

char str[81]={0};
printf("Enter any string up to 80 characters\n");
scanf("%80s\n",str);
ReverseString(str)

Besides, you should avoid gets function. It leads to buffer overflows

share|improve this answer
    
Right about needing some memory for the buffer - wrong about how to read into the buffer. –  anon Jul 3 '09 at 18:53
    
ooops, thanks you two –  Tom Jul 3 '09 at 18:54
    
Tom,what about the memory wastage if for instance say we just enter the string of 20 bytes,so reamining 60 bytes get wasted.Can that me justified??Please correct me if i am wrong –  Maddy Jul 3 '09 at 18:59
1  
While a legitimate question, at this point in your learning, you shouldn't really worry about 59 bytes of 'wasted' data. When you start using *alloc to allocate space, you can worry about extra space. –  Nick Presta Jul 3 '09 at 19:01
    
@GNR :How can you expect to know how much is the user going to type in? If he typs 20, ok, too bad, 60 bytes gone to waste. Thats not a problem, because those will be freed once the stack unwinds (i.e main finishes) –  Tom Jul 3 '09 at 19:01
show 6 more comments
#include<stdio.h>
void reverse(char s[])
{
        int i=0,j,x=0,z;
        printf("\nThe string is : ");
        printf("%s",s);
        printf("\nThe reverse string is : ");
        while(s[i] != ' ')
        {
                while(s[i] != ' ')
                        i++;
                z=i+1;
                for(j=i-1;j>=x;j--)
                        printf("%c",s[j]);
                printf(" ");
                i=z;
                x=z;
        }
}
main()
{
char s[50];
int a;
for(a=0;a<50;a++)
        s[a]=' ';
puts("\nEnter a sentence : ");
fgets(s,50,stdin);
reverse(s);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is terrible code in every way imaginable. –  Dan Sep 27 '12 at 4:32
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