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I am attempting to use the NLTK Naive Bayes classifier to guess which articles I will like on and indeed I got >85% accuracy from about 500 article titles. Unfortunately, I realized it was just classifying all the articles as 'bad'

On the bright side, it gives me a list of informative features that sort of makes sense. I have searched on this site and looked at NLTK's book as well as another tutorial (both deal with movies reviews from NLTK's own files).

Is there anything glaringly wrong with how I train this classifier? Hopefully the code snippet underneath is enough. Is it possible rejecting all titles correct for Naive Bayes?

def title_words(doc, vocab):
    """ features for document classifier"""
    words = set([x.lower() for x in doc[0].replace(". ", " ").split(' ')])
    features = dict([( 'contains(%s)' % word , (word in words)) for word in vocab] )
    return features

# get articles from database
conn = sqlite3.connect('arxiv.db')
c = conn.cursor()

# each row in the database is a 3-tuple: (title, abstract, tag)
articles = c.execute("select * from arXiv").fetchall()

# build vocabulary list
for the in articles:
        vocab = vocab | set([x.lower() for x in the[0].split(' ')])
# get feature dictionary from title
titles = [(title_words(x, vocab),x[2])  for x in articles]

n = len(titles)/2
train_set, test_set = titles[:n], titles[n:]
classifier = nltk.NaiveBayesClassifier.train(train_set)

print nltk.classify.accuracy(classifier, test_set)


is there a problem if the number of features is around 2000? common words like "the" and "because" are unlikely distinguish between "interesting" and "boring". I imagine instead I am looking for specialized terms in different combinations, so I was hoping the classifier would pick out which specialized terms would induce me to read...

share|improve this question
Have you tried the MaxentClassifier? Sometimes NaiveBayes just isn't very good. – Jacob May 30 '12 at 0:00
Looks like you're using only single-word features? Perhaps there just isn't a linear boundary between "interesting" and "not interesting". Try bigram features. – larsmans May 30 '12 at 12:42

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