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I have the following sql which takes a long time to execute, are there any better way of writing this to improve speed.

Any help is highly appreciable.

Thanks

    SELECT a.KeyField
    FROM Details a,
         Master b
    WHERE a.ForeignKeyField = b.ForeignKeyField
      AND a.KeyField IS NOT NULL
      AND Date BETWEEN 
TO_DATE ('01-01-2011', 'dd-mm-yyyy') AND TO_DATE ('31-12-2011', 'dd-mm-yyyy')
      AND a.KeyField IN
        (SELECT p.KeyField
         FROM Details p,
              Master q
         WHERE q.ForeignKeyField = p.ForeignKeyField
           AND p.KeyField IS NOT NULL
           AND p.KeyField = a.KeyField
           AND q.FKField2 = b.FKField2
         GROUP BY p.KeyField,
                  q.Date HAVING COUNT (DISTINCT q.ForeignKeyField) > 1)
    GROUP BY b.Id,
             b.Name,
             b.ForeignKeyField,
             b.Date,
             a.ForeignKeyField,
             a.SomeOtherField,
             a.KeyField,
             b.EtcEtc
share|improve this question
1  
Prefer a JOIN to WHERE for joining tables, and always do SmallTable INNER JOIN BigTable. –  MPelletier May 29 '12 at 19:00
    
@MPelletier great info! can you please explain why SmallTable INNER JOIN BigTable –  IIIIIllllllllIlllllIIIIIIIIlll May 29 '12 at 19:03
    
what are your indexes? –  HLGEM May 29 '12 at 19:04
    
@АртёмЦарионов It's a rule of thumb, but it works most of the time. The DB engine (for any SQL DB, really) will try and match from the first table (Small) to the second (Big), so it's faster to go one-by-one in the smaller list and look up in the big, than the reverse. That's what I found by experience. –  MPelletier May 29 '12 at 19:30
    
@MPelletier thank you - why wouldnt the engine just reverse it itself?? –  IIIIIllllllllIlllllIIIIIIIIlll May 29 '12 at 20:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, you need to learn proper join syntax. My guess is that Oracle is choosing a suboptimal query path because of the correlated subquery. Let's change it to a join instead:

SELECT a.KeyField
FROM Details a join
 Master b
 on a.ForeignKeyField = b.ForeignKeyField join
 (SELECT p.KeyField, q.Date, q.FKField2
  FROM Details p join
       Master q
       on q.ForeignKeyField = p.ForeignKeyField
  WHERE p.KeyField IS NOT NULL AND
        q.FKField2 = b.FKField2
  GROUP BY p.KeyField, q.Date
  HAVING COUNT (DISTINCT q.ForeignKeyField) > 1
 ) t
 on a.KeyField = t.KeyField and
    b.FKField2 = t.FKField2
WHERE a.KeyField IS NOT NULL AND
  Date BETWEEN TO_DATE ('01-01-2011', 'dd-mm-yyyy') AND TO_DATE ('31-12-2011', 'dd-mm-yyyy') AND
GROUP BY b.Id, b.Name, b.ForeignKeyField, b.Date, a.ForeignKeyField, a.SomeOtherField, a.KeyField, 
     b.EtcEtc

Writing it this way also makes me realize that there is no condition on the Date, although that is used in the subquery. Is this correct?

share|improve this answer
    
Date time is used in outer query as I have the condition entry_date BETWEEN –  user75ponic May 29 '12 at 19:09
    
Having JOIN instead of where has increased the speed, I will do a thorough test tomorrow for the results. Thanks a lot. –  user75ponic May 29 '12 at 19:30
    
When I did a small test I have noticed that there are a lot of rows got retrieved with the query. Is this because when I executed I removed sh_status_code part from the query? I will be doing a thorough test though. –  user75ponic May 29 '12 at 20:06

run an EXPLAIN on your query, and you will see where the slowness is coming from. However, in general if you can avoid nested queries (your IN statement) and DISTINCT your queries will perform better. See if you can get away with joining the Details and Master tables twice within the same query and place indexes accordingly

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Make sure that you have the relevant indices in place. Check the execution plan to verify that they are actually being used. Oracle is quite picky when it comes to choosing an index.

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i don't understand the reason for the inner query. i would simplify like this:

SELECT a.KeyField
FROM Details a,
     Master b
WHERE a.ForeignKeyField = b.ForeignKeyField
  AND a.KeyField IS NOT NULL
  AND Date >= TO_DATE ('01-01-2011', 'dd-mm-yyyy')
  AND Date <= TO_DATE ('31-12-2011', 'dd-mm-yyyy')

GROUP BY b.Id,
         b.Name,
         b.ForeignKeyField,
         b.Date,
         a.ForeignKeyField,
         a.SomeOtherField,
         a.KeyField,
         b.EtcEtc
HAVING COUNT (DISTINCT q.ForeignKeyField) > 1

also replacing BETWEEN with >=, <= will help

share|improve this answer
1  
Do not encourage the sql antipattern of implicit joins –  HLGEM May 29 '12 at 19:03
    
can you explain what antipattern? –  IIIIIllllllllIlllllIIIIIIIIlll May 29 '12 at 19:03
    
btw i have huge respect for you for the following reasons: 1. you have helped in the past enormously, 2. you are not afraid of asking questions (even though other users with high points are), 3. you do not have a ghost account that you use to hide your downvoted answers unlike the other high-profile users –  IIIIIllllllllIlllllIIIIIIIIlll May 29 '12 at 19:06
    
implicit joins are easy to get incorrect and have accidental cross joins, they are also more difficult to maintain especially if you later need to change to outer joins as implict and explicit joins shoudl not be mixed. For more information read Bill Karwin's excellent book: amazon.com/SQL-Antipatterns-Programming-Pragmatic-Programmers/… –  HLGEM May 29 '12 at 19:09
1  
BETWEEN is not always the evil monster we think it is. Normally the DB engine should be able to go through the table once with between, whereas it will go through table twice with >=, <=. –  MPelletier May 29 '12 at 20:12

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