Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to split Java Strings at any " character. The main thing is, the previous character to that may not be a backslash ( \ ).

So these Strings would split like so:

asdnaoe"asduwd"adfdgb         =>   asdnaoe, asduwd, adfgfb
addfgmmnp"fd asd\"das"fsfk    =>   addfgmmnp, fd asd\"das, fsfk

Is there any easy way to achieve this using regular expressions? (I use RegEx because it is easiest for me, the coder. Also performance is not an issue...)

Thank you in advance.

I solved it like this:

    private static String[] split(String s) {
    char[] cs = s.toCharArray();

    int n = 1;

    for (int i = 0; i < cs.length; i++) {
        if (cs[i] == '"') {
            int sn = 0;

            for (int j = i - 1; j >= 0; j--) {
                if (cs[j] == '\\')
                    sn += 1;
                else
                    break;
            }

            if (sn % 2 == 0)
                n += 1;
        }
    }

    String[] result = new String[n];

    int lastBreakPos = 0;
    int index = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < cs.length; i++) {
        if (cs[i] == '"') {
            int sn = 0;

            for (int j = i - 1; j >= 0; j--) {
                if (cs[j] == '\\')
                    sn += 1;
                else
                    break;
            }

            if (sn % 2 == 0) {
                char[] splitcs = new char[i - lastBreakPos];

                System.arraycopy(cs, lastBreakPos, splitcs, 0, i - lastBreakPos);
                lastBreakPos = i + 1;

                result[index] = new StringBuilder().append(splitcs).toString();
                index += 1;
            }
        }
    }

    char[] splitcs = new char[cs.length - (lastBreakPos + 1)];

    System.arraycopy(cs, lastBreakPos, splitcs, 0, cs.length - (lastBreakPos + 1));

    result[index] = new StringBuilder().append(splitcs).toString();

    return result;
}

Anyways, thanks for all your great responses! (Oh, and despite this, I will be using either @biziclop's or @Alan Moore's version, as they 're shorter and probably more efficient! =)

share|improve this question
1  
I'm thinking some kind of negative lookbehind for a backslash? –  Louis Wasserman May 29 '12 at 18:59
    
How about \\" though? –  biziclop May 29 '12 at 19:01
    
@LouisWasserman Isn't that the same as a lookahead? :) –  biziclop May 29 '12 at 19:03
    
"Negative lookbehind" says that you should look behind and not see something, not that you're looking behind a negative number of characters. –  Louis Wasserman May 29 '12 at 19:04
    
@LouisWasserman I know, it just struck me how funny it actually sounds. –  biziclop May 29 '12 at 19:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Sure, just use

(?<!\\)"

Quick PowerShell test:

PS> 'addfgmmnp"fd asd\"das"fsfk' -split '(?<!\\)"'
addfgmmnp
fd asd\"das
fsfk

However, this won't split on \\" (an escaped backslash, followed by a normal quote [at least in most C-like languages' escaping rules]). You cannot really solve that in Java, though, as arbitrary-length lookbehind isn't supported:

PS> 'addfgmmnp"fd asd\\"das"fsfk' -split '(?<!\\)"'
addfgmmnp
fd asd\\"das
fsfk

Usually you would expect a proper solution to split on the remaining " because it isn't really escaped.

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm really not seeing how this doesn't work in all cases. Have you tested it on the case you claim fails? –  Louis Wasserman May 29 '12 at 19:05
    
This could work as a temporary solution. So thanks! But would there be any easy (?) way to implement this maybe not using RegEx then? –  Tom S. May 29 '12 at 19:09
2  
@TomS Of course, by writing your own little state machine (you'd have three or four states) and reading character by character. It's quite simple really.. –  biziclop May 29 '12 at 19:12
    
I tested your expression in Regexplanet (regexplanet.com/advanced/java/index.html) and it worked just fine. –  rlinden May 29 '12 at 19:22
2  
Not in a lookbehind. Not in Java at least. –  Joey May 29 '12 at 19:51

You can solve this problem with a Java regex; just don't use split().

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception
{
  String[] strs = {
      "asdnaoe\"asduwd\"adfdgb",
      "addfgmmnp\"fd asd\\\"das\"fsfk"
  };

  for (String str : strs)
  {
    System.out.printf("%n%-28s=>  %s%n", str, splitIt(str));
  }
} 


public static List<String> splitIt(String s)
{
  ArrayList<String> result = new ArrayList<String>();
  Matcher m = Pattern.compile("([^\"\\\\]|\\\\.)+").matcher(s);
  while (m.find())
  {
    result.add(m.group());
  }
  return result;
}

output:

asdnaoe"asduwd"adfdgb       => [asdnaoe, asduwd, adfdgb]

addfgmmnp"fd asd\"das"fsfk  => [addfgmmnp, fd asd\"das, fsfk]

The core regex, [^"\\]|\\., consumes anything that's not a backslash or a quotation mark, or a backslash followed by anything--so \\\" would be matched as an escaped backslash (\\) followed by an escaped quote (\").

share|improve this answer

Just for reference, here's a non-regexp solution that handles escaping of \ as well. (In real life, this could be simplified, there's no real need for the START_NEW state, but I tried to write it in a way that's easier to read.)

public class Splitter {

    private enum State {
        IN_TEXT, ESCAPING, START_NEW;
    }

    public static List<String> split( String source ) {
        LinkedList<String> ret = new LinkedList<String>();
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        State state = State.START_NEW;
        for( int i = 0; i < source.length(); i++ ) {
            char next = source.charAt( i );
            if( next == '\\' && state != State.ESCAPING ) {
                state = State.ESCAPING;
            } else if( next == '\\' && state == State.ESCAPING ) {
                state = State.IN_TEXT;
            } else if( next == '"' && state != State.ESCAPING ) {
                ret.add( sb.toString() );
                sb = new StringBuilder();
                state = State.START_NEW;
            } else {
                state = State.IN_TEXT;
            }
            if( state != State.START_NEW ) {
                  sb.append( next );
            }
        }
        ret.add( sb.toString() );
        return ret;
    }

}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.