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How do I organize a Python package so its code runs from the top-level directory without adding that directory to the host's Python path?

I would also like to organize the code so I can run tests from the various test subdirectories, again without adding the package's top-level directory to the python path.

Consider the following code layout:

foobar/
  __init__.py
  README.txt
  its_a_module.py
  one_package/
    __init__.py
    foo.py
    bar.py
    tests/
      __init__.py
       testing_one_package.py
  tests/
    __init__.py
    test_foobar.py
  • When in foobar/, I should be able to import foobar and all its submodules in the python interpreter
  • From foobar/, I should be able to run tests/test_foobar.py.
  • From foobar/tests, I should be able to run test_foobar.py
  • From one_package/tests, I should be able to run testing_one_package.py.

How do I organize the import statements of my various modules, and the contents of my init.py files, to meet those objectives?

(I would like to use distutils to manage the code, and I read that running the code from the top-level directory is a useful precursor.)

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1  
it's perfectly unclear what is the actual problem, and what you have tried to solve it so far. –  moooeeeep May 29 '12 at 20:27
    
I just set PYTHONPATH=$PWD when I'm doing this (e.g., PYTHONPATH=$PWD python tests/test_foobar.py). –  larsks May 29 '12 at 20:54
    
It's rather simple. Don't run code from inside the package, but one level up. –  Cat Plus Plus May 29 '12 at 21:22
    
That makes sense but suggests that I can't meet the criteria of running tests from their test directories, at least not without messing with the paty. Is that so? –  chernevik May 29 '12 at 23:20
    
This also raises the question of properly setting the import statements. If testing_one_package imports foobar.its_a_module, this doesn't work. –  chernevik May 30 '12 at 0:31

1 Answer 1

You can add .. to your PYTHONPATH. That will satisfy your first two conditions:

  • When in foobar/, I should be able to import foobar and all its submodules in the python interpreter
  • From foobar/, I should be able to run tests/test_foobar.py.

You can always import absolutely, import foobar and from foobar.one_package import ... no import one_package and other relative imports. In this way you can run any submodule from the foobar dir.

For the other two stipulations,

  • From foobar/tests, I should be able to run test_foobar.py
  • From one_package/tests, I should be able to run testing_one_package.py.

you could add grandparents and great-grandparents of the PWD to the PYTHONPATH but I have never heard of this and it sounds bad. You can't really get around installing foobar, ie, putting it on your path, if you want the foobar package to be available no matter how deeply you go.

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I'm not sure if you mean adding '..' explicitly to the path, or the directory string represented thereby. If the latter, I explicitly don't want to do that, I want to be able to run the code without messing with sys.path. –  chernevik May 29 '12 at 23:19
    
.. explicitly, the parent of the current dir. –  Skylar Saveland May 29 '12 at 23:22

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