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How to send to server 4 bytes int and on server side conver this buffer to int.

client side:

void send_my_id()
{
 int my_id = 1233;
 char data_to_send[4];
 // how to convert my_id to data_send?
 send(sock, (const char*)data_to_send, 4, 0);
}

server side:

void receive_id()
{
 int client_id;
 char buffer[4];
 recv(client_sock, buffer, 4, 0);
 // how to conver buffer to client_id? it must be 1233;
}
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1  
How about atoi for the receive, and itoa for the send? –  Almo May 29 '12 at 21:10
    
Yup - sending/receiving text will work, too. –  paulsm4 May 29 '12 at 21:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You may simply cast the address of your int to char* and pass it to send/recv. Note the use of htonl and ntohl to deal with endianness.

void send_my_id()
{
 int my_id = 1233;
 int my_net_id = htonl(my_id);
 send(sock, (const char*)&my_net_id, 4, 0);
}

void receive_id()
{
 int my_net_id;
 int client_id;
 recv(client_sock, &my_net_id, 4, 0);
 client_id = ntohl(my_net_id);
}

Note: I preserved the lack of result-checking. In reality, you'll need extra code to ensure that both send and recv transfer all of the required bytes.

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@MooingDuck thanks. –  Robᵩ May 29 '12 at 23:11

The usual convention since the beginning of the internet was to send binary integers in Network Byte Order (read big-endian). You can use htonl(3) and friends to do that.

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On sending side:

int my_id = 1233;
char data_to_send[4];
memcpy(&data_to_send, &my_id, sizeof(my_id));
send(sock, (const char*)data_to_send, 4, 0);

On receiving side:

int client_id;
char buffer[4];
recv(client_sock, buffer, 4, 0);
memcpy(&my_id, &buffer, sizeof(my_id));

NB: size of int and endianness must be the same on both sides.

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3  
And if the "endianness" isn't the same, then you need ntohl() and friends. The best policy is to simply use ntohl() whether you absolutely need it or not - it's just a good habit. IMHO... –  paulsm4 May 29 '12 at 21:22
    
...better it be more than a good habit. IMHO you won't survive long with the above code in the wild (pun intended). –  Andreas Spindler Nov 26 '14 at 10:14

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