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I am struggling with the following problem...

Given a collection of maps

[
 {:a 1 :b 1 :c 1 :d 1}
 {:a 1 :b 2 :c 1 :d 2}
 {:a 1 :b 2 :c 2 :d 3}
 {:a 2 :b 1 :c 1 :d 5}
 {:a 2 :b 1 :c 1 :d 6}
 {:a 2 :b 1 :c 1 :d 7}
 {:a 2 :b 2 :c 1 :d 7}
 {:a 2 :b 3 :c 1 :d 7}
]

want to reduce/transform to...

{
 1 {:b [1 2] :c [1 2] :d [1 2 3]}
 2 {:b [1 2 3] :c 1 :d [5 6 7]}
}

group-by :a (primary key) and accumulate the distinct values for other keys. I can do this in a brute force/imperative way, but struggling to figure out how to solve this in clojure way.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Of the first map entry, I see how you arrive at {:b [1 2] } but not how you get to {:c [1 2]}. It almost look like it should be {:c [1 1]}. Can you state the algorithm empirically? –  octopusgrabbus May 29 '12 at 21:23
    
Since :a is the primary key, the first 3 maps reduces to 1 record and within the 3 maps, when the distinct values for the other keys are accumuated should result in :b [1 2] :c [1 2] and :d [1 2 3]. Will a nested/recursive group-by do this? –  user922621 May 29 '12 at 21:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is an admittedly inelegant, first-draft solution:

(defn reducing-fn [list-of-maps grouping-key]
    (reduce (fn [m [k lst]]
              (assoc m k (dissoc (reduce (fn [m1 m2]
                                           (apply hash-map
                                                  (apply concat
                                                         (for [[k v] m2]
                                                           [k (conj (get m1 k #{}) v)]))))
                                         {}
                                         lst)
                                 grouping-key)))
            {}
            (group-by #(grouping-key %) list-of-maps)))

user> (reducing-fn [{:a 1 :b 1 :c 1 :d 1}
                    {:a 1 :b 2 :c 1 :d 2}
                    {:a 1 :b 2 :c 2 :d 3}
                    {:a 2 :b 1 :c 1 :d 5}
                    {:a 2 :b 1 :c 1 :d 6}
                    {:a 2 :b 1 :c 1 :d 7}
                    {:a 2 :b 2 :c 1 :d 7}
                    {:a 2 :b 3 :c 1 :d 7}] 
                   :a)
=> {2 {:c #{1}, :b #{1 2 3}, :d #{5 6 7}}, 1 {:c #{1 2}, :b #{1 2}, :d #{1 2 3}}}

Will try and figure out a more polished approach tomorrow, heading off to bed right now :)

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Thank you very much. Tried your function on real data, works like a charm. Now, I need to dissect your function and understand it. –  user922621 May 29 '12 at 22:49
(use 'clojure.set)
(def data
  [
   {:a 1 :b 1 :c 1 :d 1}
   {:a 1 :b 2 :c 1 :d 2}
   {:a 1 :b 2 :c 2 :d 3}
   {:a 2 :b 1 :c 1 :d 5}
   {:a 2 :b 1 :c 1 :d 6}
   {:a 2 :b 1 :c 1 :d 7}
   {:a 2 :b 2 :c 1 :d 7}
   {:a 2 :b 3 :c 1 :d 7}
  ]
)

(defn key-join
  "join of map by key , value is distinct."
  [map-list]
  (let [keys (keys (first map-list))]
       (into {} (for [k keys] [k (vec (set (map #(% k) map-list)))]))))

(defn group-reduce [key map-list]
  (let [sdata (set map-list)
        group-value (project sdata [key])]
       (into {}
         (for [m group-value] [(key m) (key-join (map #(dissoc % key) (select #(= (key %) (key m)) sdata)))]))))
;;other version fast than group-reduce 
(defn gr [key map-list]
  (let [gdata (group-by key map-list)]
    (into {} (for [[k m] gdata][k (dissoc (key-join m) key)]))))
user=> (group-reduce :a data)
{1 {:c [1 2], :b [1 2], :d [1 2 3]}, 2 {:c [1], :b [1 2 3], :d [5 6 7]}}
user=> (gr :a data)
{1 {:c [1 2], :b [1 2], :d [1 2 3]}, 2 {:c [1], :b [1 2 3], :d [5 6 7]}}
share|improve this answer

Another solution:

(defn pivot [new-key m]
  (apply merge 
    (for [[a v] (group-by new-key m)]
      {a (let [ks (set (flatten (map keys (map #(dissoc % new-key) v))))]
            (zipmap ks (for [k ks] (set (map k v)))))})))

ETA: new-key would be the :a key here and m is your input map.

The first "for" destructures the group-by. That's where you're partitioning the data by the input "new-key." "for" generates a list - it's like Python's list comprehension. Here we're generating a list of maps, each with one key, whose value is a map. First we need to extract the relevant keys. These keys are held in the "ks" binding. We want to accumulate distinct values. While we could do this using reduce, since keywords are also functions, we can use them to extract across the collection and then use "set" to reduce down to distinct values. "zipmap" ties together our keys and their associated values. Then outside the main "for," we need to convert this list of maps into a single map whose keys are the distinct values of "a".

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Thanks for the detailed explanation. Like the elegance and compactness of your solution. –  user922621 May 30 '12 at 16:03

Another solution:

(defn transform
  [key coll]
  (letfn [(merge-maps
            [coll]
            (apply merge-with (fnil conj #{}) {} coll))
          (process-key
            [[k v]]
            [k (dissoc (merge-maps v) key)])]
    (->> coll
      (group-by #(get % key))
      (map process-key)
      (into (empty coll)))))

Code untested, though.

EDIT: Of course it doesn't work, because of merge-with trying to be too clever.

(defn transform
  [key coll]
  (letfn [(local-merge-with
            [f m & ms]
            (reduce (fn [m [k v]] (update-in m [k] f v))
                    m
                    (for [m ms e m] e)))
          (merge-maps
            [coll]
            (apply local-merge-with (fnil conj #{}) {} coll))
          (process-key
            [[k v]]
            [k (dissoc (merge-maps v) key)])]
    (->> coll
      (group-by #(get % key))
      (map process-key)
      (into (empty coll)))))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the solution. The second one works. This is first time seeing the use of letfn –  user922621 May 30 '12 at 16:05

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