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// let's say there is a list of 1000+ URLs
string[] urls = { "http://google.com", "http://yahoo.com", ... };

// now let's send HTTP requests to each of these URLs in parallel
urls.AsParallel().ForAll(async (url) => {
    var client = new HttpClient();
    var html = await client.GetStringAsync(url);
});

Here is the problem, it starts 1000+ simultaneous web requests. Is there an easy way to limit the concurrent amount of these async http requests? So that no more than 20 web pages are downloaded at any given time. How to do it in the most efficient manner?

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2  
How is this different from your previous question? –  svick May 29 '12 at 21:40
1  
stackoverflow.com/questions/9290498/… With a ParallelOptions parameter. –  Chris Disley May 29 '12 at 21:46
2  
@ChrisDisley, this will only parallelize the launching of the requests. –  spender May 29 '12 at 21:48
    
@svick is right, how is it different? btw, I love the answer there stackoverflow.com/a/10802883/66372 –  eglasius Jan 30 at 8:23

6 Answers 6

up vote 42 down vote accepted

You can definitely do this in the latest versions of async for .NET, using .NET 4.5 Beta. The previous post from 'usr' points to a good article written by Stephen Toub, but the less announced news is that the async semaphore actually made it into the Beta release of .NET 4.5

If you look at our beloved SemaphoreSlim class (which you should be using since it's more performant than the original Semaphore), it now boasts the WaitAsync(...) series of overloads, with all of the expected arguments - timeout intervals, cancellation tokens, all of your usual scheduling friends :)

Stephen's also written a more recent blog post about the new .NET 4.5 goodies that came out with Beta: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/pfxteam/archive/2012/02/29/10274035.aspx

Last, here's some sample code about how to use SemaphoreSlim for async method throttling:

async Task MyOuterMethod() {

    // let's say there is a list of 1000+ URLs
    string[] urls = { "http://google.com", "http://yahoo.com", ... };

    // now let's send HTTP requests to each of these URLs in parallel
    List<Task> allTasks = new List<Task>();
    SemaphoreSlim throttler = new SemaphoreSlim(initialCount: 20);
    foreach (var url in urls) {

        // do an async wait until we can schedule again
        await throttler.WaitAsync();

        // using Task.Run(...) to run the lambda in its own parallel
        // flow on the threadpool
        allTasks.Add(Task.Run(async () => {
            try {
                var client = new HttpClient();
                var html = await client.GetStringAsync(url);
            } finally {
                throttler.Release();
            }
        }));
    }

    // won't get here until all urls have been put into tasks
    await Task.WhenAll(allTasks);

    // won't get here until all tasks have completed in some way
    // (either success or exception)
}

Last, but probably a worthy mention is a solution that uses TPL-based scheduling. You can create delegate-bound tasks on the TPL that have not yet been started, and allow for a custom task scheduler to limit the concurrency. In fact, there's an MSDN sample for it here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee789351

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+1 Perfect. Thanks! –  Grief Coder May 30 '12 at 12:37
    
SemaphoreSlim. Didn't know about that. Nice. +1 –  spender Oct 28 '12 at 1:51
    
Doesn't this code end up creating a list containing as many task objects as there are urls? is there anyway to avoid this? –  GreyCloud Mar 19 '13 at 11:54
1  
isn't a parallel.foreach with a limited degree of parallelism a nicer approach? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  GreyCloud Mar 19 '13 at 11:59
    
This is exactly what i was looking for! We need to process a couple of hundred xml feeds and ran into the same issues. Thanks for your answer! –  Rob Angelier Apr 25 '13 at 18:21

Unfortunately, the .NET Framework is missing most important combinators for orchestrating parallel async tasks. There is no such thing built-in.

Look at the AsyncSemaphore class built by the most respectable Stephen Toub. What you want is called a semaphore, and you need an async version of it.

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1  
+1 Cool thanks. –  Grief Coder May 29 '12 at 21:51
6  
Note that "Unfortunately, the .NET Framework is missing most important combinators for orchestrating parallel async tasks. There is no such thing built-in." is no longer correct as of .NET 4.5 Beta. SemaphoreSlim now offers WaitAsync(...) functionality :) –  Theo Yaung May 30 '12 at 6:03
    
Should SemaphoreSlim (with its new async methods) be preferred over AsyncSemphore, or does Toub's implementation still have some advantage? –  Todd Menier Apr 18 '13 at 17:53
    
In my opinion, the built-in type should be preferred because it is likely to be well-tested and well-designed. –  usr Apr 18 '13 at 18:02
    
Stephen added a comment in response to a question on his blog post confirming that using SemaphoreSlim for .NET 4.5 would generally be the way to go. –  jdasilva Jun 15 '13 at 20:52

Use MaxDegreeOfParallelism, which is an option you can specify in Parallel.ForeEach():

var options = new ParallelOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 20 };

Parallel.ForEach(urls, options,
    url =>
        {
            var client = new HttpClient();
            var html = client.GetStringAsync(url);
            // do stuff with html
        });
share|improve this answer
2  
Setting the MaxDegreeOfParallelism won't make any difference here. It sets the amount of concurrent threads (which is by the way cannot be more than the amount of CPUs on the machine). And also async operations don't use those threads anyway. –  Grief Coder May 29 '12 at 21:45
1  
It operates on the number of concurrent operations, not the number of threads. However, each concurrent operation will use a ThreadPool thread, of which you can usually have thousands (not that that's a great idea). The scheduler will automatically take care of the rest for you - including yielding control while waiting on I/O. Which is why I didn't use async in the example code - it isn't really necessary. –  Sean U May 29 '12 at 21:52
    
But you're using await inside the method? –  Grief Coder May 29 '12 at 21:56
    
Oops. I forgot to remove that when I copied the code from your example. Fixed. –  Sean U May 29 '12 at 21:57

Theo Yaung example is nice, but there is a variant without list of waiting tasks.

 class SomeChecker
 {
    private const int ThreadCount=20;
    private CountdownEvent _countdownEvent;
    private SemaphoreSlim _throttler;

    public Task Check(IList<string> urls)
    {
        _countdownEvent = new CountdownEvent(urls.Count);
        _throttler = new SemaphoreSlim(ThreadCount); 

        return Task.Run( // prevent UI thread lock
            async  () =>{
                foreach (var url in urls)
                {
                    // do an async wait until we can schedule again
                    await _throttler.WaitAsync();
                    ProccessUrl(url); // NOT await
                }
                //instead of await Task.WhenAll(allTasks);
                _countdownEvent.Wait();
            });
    }

    private async Task ProccessUrl(string url)
    {
        try
        {
            var page = await new WebClient()
                       .DownloadStringTaskAsync(new Uri(url)); 
            ProccessResult(page);
        }
        finally
        {
            _throttler.Release();
            _countdownEvent.Signal();
        }
    }

    private void ProccessResult(string page){/*....*/}
}
share|improve this answer

Parallel computations should be used for speeding up CPU-bound operations. Here we are talking about I/O bound operations. Your implementation should be purely async, unless you're overwhelming the busy single core on your multi-core CPU.

EDIT I like the suggestion made by usr to use an "async semaphore" here.

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Good point! Though each task here will contain async and sync code (page downloaded asynchronously then processed in sync manner). I am trying to distribute the sync portion of the code accross CPUs and at the same time limit the amount of concurrent async I/O operations. –  Grief Coder May 29 '12 at 21:39
    
Why? Because launching 1000+ http requests simultaneously might not be a task well suited to the user's network capacity. –  spender May 29 '12 at 21:44
    
Parallel extensions can also be used as a way to multiplex I/O operations without having to manually implement a pure async solution. Which I agree could be considered sloppy, but as long as you keep a tight limit on the number of concurrent operations it probably won't strain the threadpool too much. –  Sean U May 29 '12 at 21:48
3  
I don't think this answer is providing an answer. Being purely async is not enough here: We really want to throttle the physical IOs in a non-blocking manner. –  usr May 29 '12 at 21:50
1  
Hmm.. not sure I agree... when working on a large project, if one too many developers takes this view, you'll get starvation even though each developer's contribution in isolation is not enough to tip things over the edge. Given that there is only one ThreadPool, even if you're treating it semi-respectfully... if everyone else is doing the same, trouble can follow. As such I always advise against running long stuff in the ThreadPool. –  spender May 30 '12 at 15:15

Although 1000 tasks might be queued very quickly, the Parallel Tasks library can only handle concurrent tasks equal to the amount of CPU cores in the machine. That means that if you have a four-core machine, only 4 tasks will be executing at a given time (unless you lower the MaxDegreeOfParallelism).

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3  
Yep, but that doesn't relate to async I/O operations. The code above will fire up 1000+ simultaneous downloads even if it is running on a single thread. –  Grief Coder May 29 '12 at 21:36
    
Didn't see the await keyword in there. Removing that should solve the problem, correct? –  scottm May 29 '12 at 21:37
2  
And introduce another one, correct? –  GregC May 29 '12 at 21:38
2  
The library certainly can handle more tasks running (with the Running status) concurrently than the amount of cores. This will be especially the case with a I/O bound Tasks. –  svick May 29 '12 at 21:42
    
@svick: yep. Do you know how to efficiently control the max concurrent TPL tasks (not threads)? –  Grief Coder May 29 '12 at 21:48

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