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I want to have XHTML+CSS progress bar with contrast colors between filled and empty background areas.

I have a problem with text color. Because filled and empty backgrounds are too contrast (this is a requirement), to remain readable the text should be double-colored to be contrast to both of them. The image should explain it better than words:

Progress bar with dark blue filled area and white empty background Example of the problem

My current progress bar implementation is trivial, but as example above shows, the text can be hard to read in some cases, which is exactly a problem I want to solve.

My current (simplified) implementation attempt (fails, because overflow: hidden does not work without positioning div.progress which I cannot position because of inner span's width):

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
       "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">
<head>
  <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />
  <title>Progress bar test</title>
  <style type="text/css">
    div.progress_bar {
        border: 1px #ccc solid; position: relative;
        text-align: center; height: 32px;
    }
    div.progress_bar .progress {
        height: 32px;
        overflow: hidden; /* This does NOT work! */
    }
    div.progress_bar .progress div {
        position: absolute; width: 100%; height: 32px;
        z-index: 30; overflow: hidden;
        background-color: #44a;
    }
    div.progress_bar span {
        position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%;
        z-index: 20;
        color: #000;
    }
    div.progress_bar .progress span {
        position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%;
        z-index: 40;
        color: #eee;
    }
  </style>
</head>
<body>
  <!-- Can be of any (unknown) width. Think of "width: auto".
       The 400px value is just to keep it small on a big monitor.
       DON'T rely on it! -->
  <div id="container" style="width: 400px;">
    <div class="progress_bar">
      <!-- div.progress is a dark filled area container -->
      <div class="progress" style="width: 51%;">
        <!-- Actually dark filled area -->
        <div style="width: 51%;"></div>
        <!-- Text (white).
             Does not clip, even with overflow: hidden on parent! -->
        <span>This is a test</span>
      </div>
      <!-- Text (black) -->
      <span>This is a test</span>
    </div>
  </div>
</body>
</html>

Live version of the above: http://drdaeman.pp.ru/tmp/20090703/test2.html
Previous attempt: http://drdaeman.pp.ru/tmp/20090703/test.html

The images are GIMP edited prototypes, and not exactly what this code displays.

Add: Thank you all, especially Meep3D, Nosredna and Lachlan! However I still have a problem — in my case progress bar should have no fixed width and take all horizontally available space (width: auto; or width: 100% are acceptable). But without width: 400px rule Lachlan's code breaks. And I'd still like to avoid using JavaScript, if that's possible.

share|improve this question
    
What, exactly, is the problem with 0% and 100%? –  Nosredna Jul 3 '09 at 20:19
    
Either it's a black text on dark blue background (very hard to read), or white text on white background (impossible to read). –  drdaeman Jul 3 '09 at 20:20
    
I must be missing something. Why not make it white when it's on dark blue and black when it's on white? –  Nosredna Jul 3 '09 at 20:21
    
I think there's a problem with 0-50% or 50-100%, not so much only 0 and 100%. Like the picture shows, it's hard to pick a single color that is readable on both background colors. –  colithium Jul 3 '09 at 20:22
1  
@Nosredna that's what he wants to do. But how? How using only the tools available would he accomplish this rather involved task? Notice that part of the 0 is white and the other part of the same glyph is black. –  colithium Jul 3 '09 at 20:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As per Meep3D's suggestion, take 2 copies of the text.

Wrap each in a div of the same width as the container. The "upper" div is wrapped with another div which clips at the desired percentage.

Update: removed the fixed widths.
The "upper" div is sized to the inverse percentage of its wrapper.

<html>
<head>
  <style type="text/css">
    #container {
        position: relative;
        border: 1px solid;
        text-align: center;
        width: 400px;
        height: 32px;
    }
    .black-on-white {
        height: 32px;
        color: #000;
    }
    .white-on-black {
        height: 32px;
        color: #fff;
        background-color: #44a;
    }
    .wrapper {
        width: 53%;
        overflow: hidden;
        position: absolute;
        top: 0; left: 0;
    }
    .black-on-white {
        width: 100%;
    }
    .white-on-black {
        width: 188.7%;
    }
  </style>
</head>
<body>
  <div id="container">
    <div class="wrapper">
        <div class="white-on-black">
             <span>This is a test</span>
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="black-on-white">
        <span>This is a test</span>
    </div>
  </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this is what I tried yesterday too. One problem — in my case progress bar should have no fixed width and take all horizontally available space. But without width: 400px rule everything breaks. And I'd like to avoid using JavaScript, if possible. –  drdaeman Jul 4 '09 at 12:48
    
Awesome! Thank you very much, it works great. Didn't thought about (1/percent) width. –  drdaeman Jul 4 '09 at 19:51

What about putting a second copy of the progress bar text inside the div, and set the div's overflow to hidden, so it reveals with it?

--

Update: I am also not a javascript expert, but I am sure that you can find out the width of an object and then set the offset based upon that if the width is flexible as you say.

share|improve this answer
2  
This is what you want to do. Have two versions of the bar over top each other and progressively reveal one of them. –  Nosredna Jul 3 '09 at 20:31
    
Sounds like a good idea. Thank you, I'll try! –  drdaeman Jul 3 '09 at 20:31
    
I've got the overall idea — it seems to be a right way to go, but the progress has no fixed width and automatically stretches to all available space, so putting a copy in inner (filled area) div with example width: 50% don't work. –  drdaeman Jul 3 '09 at 20:45

You could:

  • Find a grey which suits
  • Use JavaScript to change the colour between white and black dynamically, depending on where it is
  • Make the middle colour of the background gradient closer to white, and always use dark text
  • Put the progress outisde the box:
[#########              ] 50 % 
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I'm considering those suggestions as a "fallback" options if I'll fail to implement what I exactly want. Still, if it's possible, I'd really like to implement it the way it's shown on the picture in my question. –  drdaeman Jul 3 '09 at 21:46

You could use a text shadow for your "percentage" text. The only downside to this is that it would only work in the latest browsers. Only Firefox 3.5, Safari (all versions), and Chrome 2+ support it.

Here is a demo of using text-shadow in a way that would make your progress readable.
http://www.w3.org/Style/Examples/007/text-shadow#white

If you're willing to use more JavaScript, you could try this jQuery plugin:

http://kilianvalkhof.com/2008/javascript/text-shadow-in-ie-with-jquery/

The article says it works in IE only, however it works in Chrome 3 (what I'm using), Firefox 3.5, Internet Explorer, and Safari. It may work in older browsers but I haven't tested it.

share|improve this answer

Meep3D has the correct answer. Two versions of the box. Reveal n% of the top one.

More options:

  • Put a translucent box under the number that either darkens the area for a white number or lightens the area for a black number.
  • Use red and white as backgrounds and a black number. (Problem here is red is associated with error, so you can play with other combinations of three colors that are all high contrast against each other.)
share|improve this answer

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