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I'm doing some testing in the wake of offline_access's expiration. I think that since all interactions my app makes with Facebook are done via my servers and are user initiated by user activity at several application end points (phone apps, website, desktop application) I can use an Application Access Token to publish to the wall on behalf of my users, assuming the application is still authorized even if the access token I requested during authorization is expired. That seems to be what the documentation here is implying with

Authenticating as an App allows you to obtain an access token which allows you to make request to the Facebook API on behalf of an App rather than a User. [...] App access tokens can also be used to publish content to Facebook on behalf of a user who has granted a publishing permission to your application.

App Access Tokens generally do not expire. Once generated, they are valid indefinitely.

However, I need to test this. So I need to expire some tokens. I tried using official test users which you create in the developer site, that can only interact with your app's sandbox and other users in it, but their tokens seem to be perpetually valid for one hour.

So I tried using a real facebook user that I created for this, and changing the password which I'd read is supposed to expire the token. But it doesn't. The token still reports valid in the debugger and I can still use it for many things, including publishing to my wall. I can even continue to use this token after logging out of the facebook site completely.

What gives? How can I get an expired access_token so that I can test my Application Access Token?

Edit: I think it's going to work. I created my application access token and used the CLIENT-SIDE flow to get an user access token that only lasted 2 hours, so I could actually just wait for it to expire. After the expiration I used the Graph API explorer to try to post a status update, which failed telling me when my token had expired. I then tried the same action using my application token which succeeded.

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Try removing the app in the user settings and reinstalling it. You should get a new token –  phwd May 29 '12 at 21:56
    
Would the old token then behave as expired, deauthorized, or invalid? A new token would just act exactly the same, wouldn't it? It'd be good for 60 days and probably wouldn't expire when I changed password either? –  Sloloem May 29 '12 at 22:27
    
@phwd apparently doing that makes the old token return as "Session does not match current stored session. This may be because the user changed the password since the time the session was created or Facebook has changed the session for security reasons." The app token does work, but I don't know if it's because there's a valid user token or if it's the fact the user authorized the app at all. –  Sloloem May 29 '12 at 23:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

This should work, check below.

Invalidating (aka logout) your token; make HTTP GET call to that endpoint;

https://api.facebook.com/restserver.php?method=auth.expireSession&format=json&access_token=<access_token>
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Why suggest using REST API methods? It clearly says there Please note: We are in the process of deprecating the REST API. We recommend using OAuth 2.0 moving forward. We will not be supporting this method in the Graph API. –  Nitzan Tomer May 30 '12 at 5:50
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agreed! but only this interface works for that purpose so far. plz contribute if you know of any other alternatives –  WareNinja May 30 '12 at 5:56
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down-voting without providing an alternative solution is not constructive approach though... –  WareNinja May 30 '12 at 5:57
    
I have presented an alternative, it's in my answer to the question. –  Nitzan Tomer May 30 '12 at 5:59
    
good point! my bad, i didnt see your prev answer, here comes +1 to this answer then :D –  WareNinja May 30 '12 at 6:01

But it says right there in the documentation, just after the last line you quoted:

App Access Tokens generally do not expire. Once generated, they are valid indefinitely. However, if you need to invalidate your App Access Token for some reason, you can reset your App Secret in your app's settings. Once your App Secret has been reset, you will need to go through the steps below to generate a new app access token.

So for your testing purposes reset the app secret key.


Edit

Oh, I completely misunderstood you.
It's easier to invalidate a user token, you just use the me/permissions connection with a DELETE request.

That will remove the app for the logged in user.
You can try that from the explorer tool, just select DELETE on the select box left to the path field.

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Facebook's terminology make it really difficult to be clear. What I have is an App access token that I get using the app ID and app secret, and according to documentation never expires. I also have a user access token I get on a per user basis by calling OAuth dialogs, which expires in 60 days. What I'm looking to do is expire that 2nd token so I can find out is if I can use my application token to perform user actions after the OAuth access token has expired, so that I don't need to continually re-authorize users. –  Sloloem May 29 '12 at 22:52
    
Oh. I edited my answer –  Nitzan Tomer May 30 '12 at 5:49
    
I need to get as close to a "61 days later" state with an expired token, not a deauthorized app. Neither token would work in that situation, so it's not really useful for testing. I managed to do some testing using short lived OAuth tokens generated using the javascript SDK, since they only last 1-2 hours. I'm hoping they'll act the same as the 60 day long tokens using the server-side flow. –  Sloloem May 30 '12 at 17:47
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If you just want to simulate the case when your token times out, then just make a request with a dummy token instead of the right one, or just don't include a token in the request to begin with. You'll get an exception from facebook, just a different once then token expired, but what's difference in this case? You can program it to happen "randomly" so that you can get the "full experience". –  Nitzan Tomer May 30 '12 at 17:56

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