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See the two examples below. Assume both classes contains public methods belonging to a widely used API library.

AClass.java is easier to write (maybe easier to read due to less noise), but when error is detected, the first method in stack trace is an internal method (nullCheck(...)) and the exception message is not referring to that method. Could this cause unnecessary confusion to the user? I mean in the sense of the user thinking: "it's an internal method which has thrown an exception, must be a bug in the library, not a fault in my program. What a ** useless library..."

BClass.java is more tiresome to write (with all its if statements), but when error is detected the first line of the stack trace pinpoints the API method (called by user) where error was first detected. Would this more likely make user think: "I'm calling that method from my code, must be something wrong with the parameter I'm passing in".

Which would be the preferred way of throwing exception when checking parameters for validity in a public API? Or are the two examples considered equal?

public class AClass {
public void publicApiMethod1(String a){
    nullCheck(a, "a");
    // do something...
}
public void publicApiMethod2(String a, String b, String c){
    nullCheck(a, "a");
    nullCheck(b, "b");
    nullCheck(c, "c");
    // do something...
}

private void nullCheck(Object a, String argName) {
    if(a == null){
        throw new NullPointerException("Null argument: " + argName);
    }
}
}


public class BClass {
public void publicApiMethod1(String a){
    if(a == null){
        throw new NullPointerException("Null argument: 'a'");
    }
    // do something...
}

public void publicApiMethod2(String a, String b, String c){
    if(a == null){
        throw new NullPointerException("Null argument: 'a'");
    }
    if(b == null){
        throw new NullPointerException("Null argument: 'b'");
    }
    if(c == null){
        throw new NullPointerException("Null argument: 'c'");
    }
    // do something...
}
}
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4 Answers

If your error message is descriptive (and it is), no one will bother to look at the stack trace. Thus the first form is better because it encapsulates the validation logic.

Note that there are plenty of assertion methods in various libraries ready to use, see: Objects.requireNonNull and Validate.notNull).

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I would do it that way, basically based on your AClass:

public void publicApiMethod2(String a, String b, String c){
    try {
        nullCheck(a, "a");
        nullCheck(b, "b");
        nullCheck(c, "c");
    }
    // catch the NullPointerException,
    // and any other Exception explicitly thrown by your validation methods
    catch (NullPointerException e) { 
         throw new IllegalArgumentException(e.getMessage());
    }
    // do something...
} 

That way, the user gets an explicit message and a stacktrace that points to the public method.

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1  
+1 for the stacktrace and NPE->IAE. But why do you catch all Exceptions? I'd rather only catch NPE (and add the NPE as IAE's cause. –  DaveFar May 29 '12 at 22:16
    
@DaveBall as per your suggestion and another user's, I've modified the catchclause. However, and it's just a matter of personal taste, I'd rather not expose more of the internals of the private methods. After all, we are talking about building a public API here... –  Alexis Pigeon May 29 '12 at 22:20
    
....good point. –  DaveFar May 29 '12 at 22:22
2  
Not good practice IME. What if you catch a NPE which you're not expecting? You'll have lost its original stack trace and it's message could well be null - so you'll have an IAE with no cause and a null message - yuck –  davidfrancis May 29 '12 at 22:33
1  
@davidfrancis I totally agree, and if it were totally up to me, I wouldn't make the nullCheck() methods throw NPEs, but rather some kind of checked exception. But I prefered to stick to the OP's already in place implementation. –  Alexis Pigeon May 29 '12 at 22:39
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in your b class why dont you use

if( (c == null)|| (b == null)|| (a == null) ){
 //thrown my red ball
 }

less tiresome, more readable

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3  
but then you can't determine which varaible is null –  Alexis Pigeon May 29 '12 at 21:59
    
Do you really need to? if so then do it your way. you could also make in the exception a string which summaries all 3 variables and their values. easy enough then to spot which one is broken. I always choose the easiest and most readable approach. I dislike repetitive code. –  Michael Dibbets May 29 '12 at 22:04
    
it's needed if you want to have an explanatory error message. and yes, you could summarize all X vars, but it can quickly get out of hand if you start having too many variables to check... –  Alexis Pigeon May 29 '12 at 22:07
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I would think that Class A is fine, as long as you clearly document it with a @throws. I have seen plenty of libraries that will throw deeper in the stack. The important thing is for the user to understand WHY an error was thrown and what they can do to avoid it.

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