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I have found as a common issue in any of my apps that the user may accidentally perform several clicks on the same button causing multiple executions of the onClick listener logic. Typically, my business logic for those onClickListeners usually consists of launching of a heavy-process AsynTask that performs an HTTP request and later modifies the UI.

My way to prevent multiple executions of the asyntask was to unable the button at the beginning of the listener method and enable it again as a first statement of the onPostExecute. That has generally worked for me or at least I have not received any issue regarding to this situation.

Recently, a colleague has pointed me a potential problem of this unable-enable-button method. As shown in the below code that consists of two buttons '+' and '-', quick and alternative presses on those buttons causes a crash the application by an ArrayOutOfIndex exception.

That fact has made me think about my way of managing the concurrency of the onClickListener events and if it is really possible to have the situation in which a second asyntask may be launches prior to the finalization of the first asyntask using the aforementioned method.

What are your suggestions to handle this situation?

For those suggestions that recommend to apply some logic rejecting the second launches of the asyntask until the completion of the first asyntask, is it is really worth to generally apply that logic for a common used application in which the buttons perform an http request?.

CrashActivity.java

public class CrashActivity extends Activity {

private int mNumbers[] = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
private int position = 0;

/** Called when the activity is first created. */
@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.main);

    final TextView result = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.resultTextView);

    final Button minusBtn = (Button) findViewById(R.id.minus_button);
    final Button plusBtn = (Button) findViewById(R.id.plus_button);

    minusBtn.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(View v) {
            minusBtn.setEnabled(false);
            plusBtn.setEnabled(true);

            result.setText("" + mNumbers[--position]);

            try {
                Thread.sleep(1000);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }

            minusBtn.setEnabled((position > 0));
        }
    });

    plusBtn.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(View v) {
            plusBtn.setEnabled(false);
            minusBtn.setEnabled(true);

            result.setText("" + mNumbers[position++]);

            try {
                Thread.sleep(1000);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            plusBtn.setEnabled((position <= 4));
        }
    });

    minusBtn.setEnabled(false);
}
}

main.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
android:layout_width="fill_parent"
android:layout_height="fill_parent"
android:orientation="vertical" >

<Button
    android:id="@+id/minus_button"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:text="-" />

<Button
    android:id="@+id/plus_button"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:text="+" />   

<TextView
    android:id="@+id/resultTextView"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:text="hello stackoverflow!" />

</LinearLayout>
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A solution that would guarantee that both methods do not try to update the UI at the same time would be to synchronize the UI update code. You could either create a synchronized method or an Object that acts as a lock for a block of code. Example:

public synchronized void updateUI() {
    // ...
}

or

private Object mLock = new Object();

public void updateUI() {
    // ...
    synchronized (mLock) {
        // Critical code here.
    }
    // ...
}

Expanding this to make sure that task 1 completes before task 2, completes before task 3, etc., you would need to somehow keep track of which started first. Note: synchronization occurs on the UI thread in this example.

private List<AsyncTask> mRunningTasks = new ArrayList<AsyncTask>();

public void onClick(View v) {
    v.setEnabled(false);
    if (v == task1View) {
        Task1 task = new Task1();
        mRunningTasks.add(task);
        task.execute();
    }
    else if (v == task2View) {
        Task2 task = new Task2();
        mRunningTasks.add(task);
        task.execute();
    }
    // ...
}

// Copy and paste for each necessary task.
private Task1 extends AsyncTask<Void, Void, Void> {
    protected Void doInBackground(Void... v) {
        // Run task 1 code here.
        while (this != mRunningTasks.get(0)) {
            wait(1000);
        }
        return v[0];
    }

    protected void onPostExecute(Void v) {
        updateUI();
        mRunningTasks.remove(0);
        task1View.setEnabled(true);
    }
}

public void updateUI() {
    // UI update code here.
}
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