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Say we have this situation:

       master
         |
A--B--B--D--E--F--G
                  |
                test

Then we merge test into master. Are commits E and F preserved in the new master branch?

That is, does it now lok like this (option A):

                master
                  |
A--B--B--D--E--F--G
                  |
                test

or like this (option B):

          master
            |
A--B--B--D--G
            |
          test

Sorry if this has already been asked, I couldn't find it. Also, the example in ProGit book is with only one commit ahead (in my example that would be E), which doesn't tackle a situation like this.

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2  
It sounds like you're horribly confused about how commits work. E and F cannot possibly be dropped without actually changing G (and its SHA1). –  Kevin Ballard May 29 '12 at 22:38
    
Not in sense that they are dropped, like never done... but rather "forgotten" from history. Of course they are foundations of G. –  Martin May 29 '12 at 23:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What happens it option A: commits are preserved. In case of a fast-forward merge the history is not modified at all, only the master branch points at a different commit. That's all.

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Thanx! It made sense that way, but still I felt urge to ask... maybe I'm just too curious :-) –  Martin May 29 '12 at 23:06

Option A is what happens. Sometimes people want to preserve the branch point and will force git to create a new merge commit.

git merge --no-ff test

This depends on the workflow you want to follow for development.

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Thanx. I'll probably come across that situation... –  Martin May 29 '12 at 23:09

You get a fast forward merge (option A) and the reason to begin with is because there is only a single line of commits between master and test before the merge. If there was a branch between master and test, it would not be a fast forward merge any more.

I would suggest reading this for a good overview on how branching and merging works in git - you need to be really clear on how this stuff works when using git.

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ProGit is of course the primary literature. Only in this section there is only one commit ahead of master (C3), and in ffwd merge it can not be forgotten. But the chapter didn't cover situation with several commits ahead of master, that's why I asked. Just to make sure. Thanx! –  Martin May 29 '12 at 23:08
    
@Martin Think about it this way - a fast forward merge is nothing but moving the master branch pointer forward until it is at the same position as the test branch pointer. If you can, then git will do it :) –  Carl May 30 '12 at 0:27
    
Yup, got it! Only wording is a BIT confusing - the pointer goes forward in terms of time, from earlier commits to more recent ones. But if you follow the commit pointers strictly, they point in the opposite direction - towards ancestor, so if we follow the pointers strictily - it's actually a REWIND merge. Isn't it? –  Martin May 30 '12 at 14:44
    
No. As stated in your other question, newer commits are added on at the end. The arrows point to where you have come from, not where you're going. –  wadesworld May 30 '12 at 15:47

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