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Running this with the ORDER BY takes over 10 seconds and ends up crashing my site when there's high traffic.

select *
from tbluserinfluences, tblcontent, tblusers
where tblcontent.userid = tblusers.id
and tbluserinfluences.userid = tblusers.id
and tbluserinfluences.lcase_influence = 'pink floyd'
order by tblcontent.score desc
limit 0, 160

Running the same query without ORDER BY takes just a couple miliseconds.

select *
from tbluserinfluences, tblcontent, tblusers
where tblcontent.userid = tblusers.id
and tbluserinfluences.userid = tblusers.id
and tbluserinfluences.lcase_influence = 'pink floyd'
order by tblcontent.score desc
limit 0, 160

Here's the EXPLAIN

enter image description here

Any ideas? I'm open to splitting it into multiple queries, creating temporary tables, or anything else that will help. This query is bugging the heck out of me (and my users).

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Can you show your table schema too? – eggyal May 29 '12 at 23:19
1  
what does SHOW CREATE TABLE tbluserinfluences; SHOW CREATE TABLE tblcontent; and SHOW CREATE TABLE tblusers return? you probably need to add an index on the score column – JiminyCricket May 29 '12 at 23:21
    
what are your indexes on those tables? – JiminyCricket May 29 '12 at 23:21
    
There is an index on tblcontent.score but I'm not sure it helps or is being used. – Philip Kaplan May 29 '12 at 23:22
    
@eggyal All the relevant comments are indexed. The fact that removing the ORDER BY makes the query super-fast lets me know that (probably) all the other indexes are fine. I think.. ? – Philip Kaplan May 29 '12 at 23:24

You likely need an index on the score column.

share|improve this answer
    
The score column is definitely indexed. However I'm not sure the index is being used. When I force it from tbluserinfluences, tblcontent force index(score), tblusers it seems to be working better. I'll keep trying and post my answer soon (if I figure it out). – Philip Kaplan May 29 '12 at 23:30
    
The ORDER BY with the LIMIT is suspicious to me. This looks like it might contain some relevant information for you: mysqlperformanceblog.com/2006/09/01/… – Jeremy Goodell May 29 '12 at 23:38
    
One of the things I ran into with indexing in 5.5 vs 5.1 is it treats multiple column indexes much differently than single column indexes. Also, the order that the indexes get processed in, should an indexed column be in multiple indexes seemed to change. – Jas Panesar May 29 '12 at 23:43
    
Here's another link: explainextended.com/2009/10/23/… Note the recommendation to rewrite the query with the limit/order by on a subquery, and the joins external to that. i.e. do the hard part without any joins. – Jeremy Goodell May 29 '12 at 23:45

OK, first things first: LIMIT hides a multitude of bad queries, right up until someone adds an ORDER BY - the LIMIT is in invitation to the DB engine to bail the query as soon as the specified number of records are generated, but as soon as an ORDER BY is added, ALL the records are internally generated, but hidden from the programmer - if a LIMIT'd query is slowed down greatly by an ORDER BY, it wasn't a good query to start with.

That said, there are a bunch of small changes to make to your query (and the DB settings) to improve things. From looking at the EXPLAIN plan (you're in the top 10% by including this) a bunch of things stand out - there are 240,000 records in the result set being sorted. From the 'Using Filesort' it looks like there's a 2-pass sort stage happening, plus the query is creating a temporary table - I'd look at increasing your sort_buffer_size, but be wary of making this too big, as I seem to recall it's per-session not a global buffer, so don't make it 256MB if you have 100 concurrent sessions - I'd guess 4MB or 8MB might be good starting positions.

If this doesn't improve things greatly I'd start working on the query itself: the EXPLAIN output tells us that the lcase_influence index has 300+ byte keys - if you move the influence string out to a separate tblInfluence, and just include the tblInfluence.id in the tbluserinfluences table, and index this then you will both drop the size of the tbluserinfluences table and the influencename-index.

If this doesn't fix the problem, then I'd look at moving the sort so that it only sorts the minimum fields required, not the entire output record. I'd also join tblUsrContent directly to tblUserInfluences - I suspect that it wouldn't make much of a difference, but if it was my code, I'd prefer single-step joins to long chains of joins where possible.

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Okay, this is a huge hack but I figured out a (temporary) solution to the problem.

The query is only slow when searching very popular bands like "pink floyd" down to "coldplay". Any band less popular than that, the query is fast.

Through some trial-and-error, I discovered that if I force the query to use the tblcontent.score index, it's super-fast for popular bands like "pink floyd", but then slow for less popular bands like "the romantics".

Hacky solution: Force score index for the top 100 bands. Let MySql use its defaults for all other bands. Sigh.

So a fast version of the pink floyd query is:

select *
from tbluserinfluences, tblcontent FORCE INDEX(score), tblusers
where tblcontent.userid = tblusers.id
and tbluserinfluences.userid = tblusers.id
and tbluserinfluences.lcase_influence = 'pink floyd'
order by tblcontent.score desc
limit 0, 160

And a fast version of the the romantics (less popular) query is:

select *
from tbluserinfluences, tblcontent, tblusers
where tblcontent.userid = tblusers.id
and tbluserinfluences.userid = tblusers.id
and tbluserinfluences.lcase_influence = 'pink floyd'
order by tblcontent.score desc
limit 0, 160

This is a decent solution for now while I'm at Defcon 5. I'll figure out something more elegant later.

share|improve this answer

Without seeing your schema, I would add an index on the SCORE field. With any index there will be a minor performance hit on INSERTs but sounds like the select query is the most important part to you.

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try this

select 
ui.*,
tc.*
tu.*
from tbluserinfluences as ui
LEFT JOIN tblusers AS tu ON tu.id = ui.userid
LEFT JOIN tblcontent AS tc ON tc.userid = tu.id
where ui.lcase_influence = 'pink floyd'
order by ???.score desc
limit 0, 160

replace ??? with the concerned table. I can't try it, but I'll start with that.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but unfortunately that query is even slower (it's still running as I type this, so not sure how long it's going to take to complete). – Philip Kaplan May 29 '12 at 23:56

change the my.ini file here: innodb_buffer_pool_size = 300M - and change the size depending the memory available you have in your pc or server. For me that worked!

share|improve this answer

this is how I would do it

select * from (
 select *
 from tbluserinfluences, tblcontent FORCE INDEX(score), tblusers
 where tblcontent.userid = tblusers.id
 and tbluserinfluences.userid = tblusers.id
 and tbluserinfluences.lcase_influence = 'pink floyd'
 limit 0, 160) tbl
order by tbl.score desc

First limit and then sorting only 160 records instead of sorting and then limit

share|improve this answer
    
i think the result may not as expected, because 160 records can't be enough to sort – clevertension Dec 4 '15 at 5:37

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