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For example I would like to simplify the std::tr1::shared_pointer template class. I would like to have an alias for std::tr1::shared_pointer.

But this doesn't work:

#include <tr1/memory>

template <class T>
class SharedPointer : public std::tr1::shared_ptr<T>
{
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    SharedPointer<int> test(new int(5));
    return 0;
}

Since the constructors are not inherited.

Is there a pattern to solve this?

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3  
Why are you still using tr1. –  dolan May 29 '12 at 23:52
1  
On a side note, it's more than a little bizarre to use anything in std::tr1 with a C++11 compiler... –  ildjarn May 29 '12 at 23:52
1  
Probably still on VS2008 or something. Not everybody can upgrade to the newest compilers, even relatively not often. Sad, but it's how it is sometimes. –  Kevin Anderson May 29 '12 at 23:53
1  
@Mehrdad : So what? If the OP gets a useless answer because they mistagged their own question, what does it matter if more people read it? –  ildjarn May 29 '12 at 23:56
1  
@Martin : Assuming a relatively recent version of GCC (you didn't mention), invoke g++ with -std=c++0x, #include <memory>, and use std::shared_ptr<>. –  ildjarn May 29 '12 at 23:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you want to alias it, a using declaration will create a true alias, rather than a subclass:

template<class T>
using SharedPointer = std::tr1::shared_ptr<T>;

Edit

A method that should work on GCC 4.6.* compilers would be to make a wrapper function around the std::tr1::shared_ptr<T>. Since GCC 4.6.* supports the C++11 library, I've used that instead of TR1:

#include <memory>
#include <utility>

template<typename T, typename... Args>
std::shared_ptr<T> make_shared_ptr(Args &&... args)
{
    return std::shared_ptr<T>(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    auto test = make_shared_ptr<int>(new int(5));
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
So I replaced my declaration with the above, but I am getting an expected unqualified-id before 'using' Error. I am using gcc 4.6.3 and I have enabled the C++0x support, by adding the command-line parameter -std=c++0x. –  Martin Drozdik May 30 '12 at 0:02
    
@MartinDrozdik: GCC 4.6 doesn't support template aliases. To use this syntax, you must upgrade to GCC 4.7, using either the std=c++0x or std=c++11 command-line parameter –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde May 30 '12 at 0:06
    
@MartinDrozdik: Maybe try template<class T> typedef std::tr1::shared_ptr<T> SharedPointer;? Though maybe GCC 4.6 doesn't support that either, not sure. –  Mehrdad May 30 '12 at 0:06
2  
@Mehrdad: That's not valid C++. The using alias was invented to provide exactly that functionality. –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde May 30 '12 at 0:13
2  
The standard provides std::make_shared, which is kinda like your function, but actually far better since it can employ a great optimization. Read up on it. –  Xeo May 30 '12 at 0:42

If you're not using C++11, then unfortunately the best you can do is:

template <class T>
struct SharedPointer
{
    typedef std::tr1::shared_ptr<T> type;
};

Which has to be used as:

SharedPointer<int>::type x(new(int));
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! This works for me, I just have to declare the typedef as public. –  Martin Drozdik May 30 '12 at 0:14
2  
Ah, right, good point -- I just changed it to a struct which has the same effect with slightly less verbosity. –  Edward Loper May 30 '12 at 0:15
    
Wow, this is pretty ingenious. Using it is just about as clean as with template aliases. –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde May 30 '12 at 0:24
    
@Ken : Until you're inside of a template, and need to prefix it with typename every time. ;-] –  ildjarn May 30 '12 at 0:32
    
@ildjarn Inside a template (function or class), you can often get away with using a local typedef, so you only need to use typename prefix once. But that's not always appropriate, and sometimes you do need to do a lot of typename prefixing. –  Edward Loper May 30 '12 at 0:57

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