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I'm trying to synchronize the following code in iOS5:

  1. an object has a method which makes an HTTP request from which it gets some data, including an URL to an image
  2. once the data arrives, the textual data is used to populate a CoreData model
  3. at the same time, a second thread is dispatched async to download the image; this thread will signal via KVO to a viewController when the image is already cached and available in the CoreData model.
  4. since the image download will take a while, we immediately return the CoreData object which has all attributes but for the image to the caller.
  5. Also, when the second thread is done downloading, the CoreData model can be saved.

This is the (simplified) code:

- (void)insideSomeMethod
{
    [SomeHTTPRequest withCompletionHandler:
     ^(id retrievedData) 
     {
         if(!retrievedData)
         {
             handler(nil);
         }

         // Populate CoreData model with retrieved Data...

         dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_HIGH, 0), ^{
             NSURL* userImageURL = [NSURL URLWithString:[retrievedData valueForKey:@"imageURL"]];
             aCoreDataNSManagedObject.profileImage = [NSData dataWithContentsOfURL:userImageURL];
         });

         handler(aCoreDataNSManagedObject);
         [self shouldCommitChangesToModel];
     }];
}

- (void)shouldCommitChangesToModel
{
    dispatch_barrier_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_HIGH, 0), ^{
        NSError *error = nil;
        if(![managedObjectContext save:&error]) 
        {
            //  Handle error
        }  
    });
}

But what's going on is that the barrier-based save-block is always executed before the the image-loading block. That is,

dispatch_barrier_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_HIGH, 0), ^{
            NSError *error = nil;
            if(![managedObjectContext save:&error]) 
            {
                //  Handle error
            }  
        });

Executes before:

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_HIGH, 0), ^{
                 NSURL* userImageURL = [NSURL URLWithString:[retrievedData valueForKey:@"imageURL"]];
                 aCoreDataNSManagedObject.profileImage = [NSData dataWithContentsOfURL:userImageURL];
             });

So obviously I'm not really dispatching the image-loading block before the barrier, or the barrier would wait until the image-loading block is done before executing (which was my intention).

What am I doing wrong? how do I make sure the image-loading block is enqueued before the barrier block?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

At first glance the issue may be that you are dispatching th barrier block on a global concurrent queue. You can only use barrier blocks on your own custom concurrent queue. Per the GCD docs on dispatch_barrier_async, if you dispatch a block to a global queue, it will behave like a normal dispatch_async call.

Mike Ash has a good blog post on GCD barrier blocks: http://www.mikeash.com/pyblog/friday-qa-2011-10-14-whats-new-in-gcd.html

Good luck

T

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I thought about that several times myself but then, don't the Apple docs state that in iOS we can't really create our own queues? So that if I "create" one I'm actually only getting an alias to one of the global ones? –  SaldaVonSchwartz May 30 '12 at 0:30
    
I believe that as of ios5 you can create your dispatch queues. –  timthetoolman May 30 '12 at 0:36
    
Yeah I just tried it and it works now. I would have sworn I read that we couldn't create our own or that creating them merely returned one of the global ones, which is why I just went for a global one explicitly in my code above. –  SaldaVonSchwartz May 30 '12 at 0:50
    
Good to hear. Have a good day! –  timthetoolman May 30 '12 at 0:52

You need to create your own queue and not dispatch to the global queues as per the ADC Docs

The queue you specify should be a concurrent queue that you create yourself using the dispatch_queue_create function. If the queue you pass to this function is a serial queue or one of the global concurrent queues, this function behaves like the dispatch_async function.

from https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/Performance/Reference/GCD_libdispatch_Ref/Reference/reference.html#//apple_ref/c/func/dispatch_barrier_async .

You can create tons of your own GCD queues just fine. gcd queues are very small and you can create tons of them without issue. You just need to free them when you're done with them.

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Just a heads up. If your deployment target is iOS6+ and you are using ARC, there is no need to release the queues (you can't). ARC will do this for you! –  Alexander W Mar 31 at 7:49

For what you seem to be trying to solve, dispatch_barrier_async may not be the best solution. Have a look at the Migrating Away From Threads section of the Concurrency Programming Guide. Just using dispatch_sync on a your own serial queue may solve your synchronization problem. Alternatively, you can use NSOperation and NSOperationQueue. Unlike GCD, NSOperation allows you to easily manage dependancies (you can do it using GCD, but it can get ugly fast).

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