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I'm generating a dummy array where keys are timestamps and values are zeroes. Start is today (date without time part) and going back for $days days in the past:

$days  = 10;
$limit = strtotime(date('Y-m-d'));
$start = $limit - (($days - 1) * 86400);

// Dummy array of timestamps and zeroes
$dummy = array_combine(range($start, $limit, 86400), array_fill(0, $days, 0));
var_dump($dummy);

array (size=10)
  1337551200 => int 0
  1337637600 => int 0
  1337724000 => int 0
  1337810400 => int 0
  1337896800 => int 0
  1337983200 => int 0
  1338069600 => int 0
  1338156000 => int 0
  1338242400 => int 0
  1338328800 => int 0 // Today is the last

This array is going to be merged with another one extracted from a MySQL result set (and its values should override dummy ones):

$keys = array_map(function($e) { return strtotime($e['date']); }, $values);
$vals = array_map(function($e) { return intval($e['count']); },   $values);

// Array of real values coming from database
$reals = array_combine($keys, $vals);
var_dump($reals);

array (size=1)
  1338328800 => int 2 // Today

Since array_merge operates a key reordering (when keys of integer type) i switched to + array operator, and the resulting array is reordered: new keys come first:

var_dump($reals + $dummy);

array (size=10)
  1338328800 => int 2 // Today become the first
  1337551200 => int 0
  1337637600 => int 0
  1337724000 => int 0
  1337810400 => int 0
  1337896800 => int 0
  1337983200 => int 0
  1338069600 => int 0
  1338156000 => int 0
  1338242400 => int 0

So question is + operator put those keys first and how can i solve this without using sort functions, as below:

$merged = $reals + $dummy;
ksort($merged);
var_dump($merged);

array (size=10)
  1337551200 => int 0
  1337637600 => int 0
  1337724000 => int 0
  1337810400 => int 0
  1337896800 => int 0
  1337983200 => int 0
  1338069600 => int 0
  1338156000 => int 0
  1338242400 => int 0
  1338328800 => int 2
share|improve this question
    
Note that you can use array_fill_keys() instead of array_combine() + array_fill(). – Matthew May 30 '12 at 0:42
up vote 0 down vote accepted

That's because + (applied to the arrays) appends the data from the right array that is not exists in the left array.

You've used var_dump($reals + $dummy); which means: take $reals which consists of 1 item (today as the first and the only element) and append everything from $dummy that has another keys.

The possible solutions are:

  1. sort the data (you mentioned that)
  2. merge manually, with foreach
share|improve this answer

As a workaround, you could use string keys in the format of YYYY-MM-DD to prevent array_merge() from re-indexing. It's also more descriptive than timestamps. You could use DatePeriod to easily create the keys.

If you are looking for an optimal solution, I would do something like this:

# begin timestamp
$ts = 1337551200;

# values from database
$values = [
  ['date' => '2012-05-23', 'count' => 42],
  ['date' => '2012-05-26', 'count' => 666]
];

# holds the key=>val pairs
$data = [];

foreach ($values as $value)
{
  $value_ts = strtotime($value['date']);

  # backfill all missing dates
  for ($missing_ts = $ts; $missing_ts < $value_ts; $missing_ts += 86400)
    $data[$missing_ts] = 0;

  # add date from database
  $data[$value_ts] = $value['count'];

  $ts = $value_ts + 86400;
}

# append all remaining dates
for ($now = time(); $ts <= $now; $ts += 86400)
  $data[$ts] = 0;

This just does one iteration over the data from the database and inserts missing keys with values of 0. It only works if $values is already sorted, and it depends on days being exactly 86400 seconds apart (as does your original solution).

It may not be 'copy-paste' ready, but it should give you an idea on how you could implement a one-pass solution with minimal overhead. Functions like array_map() are nice to provide very concise code, but if you're really dealing with lots of data, I would expect that this type of solution will be the fasted. (Benchmark to find out.)

share|improve this answer
    
What would this change? + would still work the same way, as a union of 2 arrays – zerkms May 30 '12 at 0:35
    
But pure int/string manipulation should be faster instead of looping on DatePeriod for large values, i'm i right? This should be also memory efficient instead of thousands of object instances... – gremo May 30 '12 at 0:35
    
@zerkms, this is a workaround to the general problem, not how + works. PHP won't nuke string keys on a merge like it does integer keys. @Gremo, nothing in PHP is memory efficient... Anyway, you wouldn't have thousands of object instances, as you would be creating strings out of them. Always benchmark before writing off a potential solution. – Matthew May 30 '12 at 0:40
    
PHP won't nuke string keys on a merge like it does integer keys -- could you please show that on example? From my perspective I don't see the difference in this particular case – zerkms May 30 '12 at 0:43
    
@zerkms, compare array_merge([12 => 'foo'], [13 => 'bar']) with array_merge(['012' => 'foo'], ['013' => 'bar']). @Gremo, Regarding performance: you don't need to use the date objects to easily build string keys. – Matthew May 30 '12 at 0:49

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