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I just started using vim a few hours ago and am working on a project. Having a decent amount of fun and frustration alike -- mostly fun though :).

I am running into an odd situation though which might be due to using Janus, but any help would be much appreciated.

When I visually select several lines using shift-v + j then do a replace on those lines to comment them :s/^/#, it successfully does what I would expect and replace the start of the lines of the visual block with #. However, at the same time it highlighted every ^ in my file (basically the first char of every line is now highlighted).

A similar thing happened when I did another substitution of :s/^/<TAB> to shift a block of code over for indention. The added tabs on each of those lines are highlighted the same.

Neither of these highlights has gone away even after I go on editing. Why is it doing that? What can I do to get it to stop? What are some easier ways to achieve what I was doing if there are any?

Thanks!

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I don't use Janus (nor know what it is), but :nohl (for nohighlight) will get rid of all the highlighting, after a search & substitute. –  ldigas May 30 '12 at 0:43
    
Thanks, worked like a charm. –  forTruce May 30 '12 at 0:53
    
@ldigas: care to return and add that as an answer? :) –  sarnold May 30 '12 at 1:04
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@sarnold - Really didn't think that was "worth" the answer. –  ldigas May 30 '12 at 1:20
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@ldigas: it might feel simple once you know :nohl, but knowing what to look for in the first place might be daunting. (Especially with vim. :) –  sarnold May 30 '12 at 1:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't use Janus (nor know what it is), but :nohl (for nohighlight) will get rid of all the highlighting, after a search & substitute.

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And if you just don't want to see searches highlighted to begin with, put set nohlsearch in your .vimrc (.vimrc.local in Janus). –  echristopherson May 30 '12 at 4:58

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