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I would like to lookup an enum from its string value (or possibly any other value). I've tried the following code but it doesn't allow static in initialisers. Is there a simple way?

public enum Verbosity {
	BRIEF,
	NORMAL,
	FULL
	;
	private static Map<String, Verbosity> stringMap = new HashMap<String, Verbosity>();
	private Verbosity() {
		stringMap.put(this.toString(), this);
	}
	public static Verbosity getVerbosity(String key) {
		return stringMap.get(key);
	}
};
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IIRC, that gives an NPE because the static initialisation is done top down (i.e. the enum constants at the top are constructed before it gets down to the stringMap initialisation). The usual solution is to use a nested class. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 3 '09 at 21:36
    
Thank you everyone for such rapid response. (FWIW I didn't find the Sun Javadocs very useful for this problem). –  peter.murray.rust Jul 3 '09 at 21:45
    
It's really a language issue than a library issue. However, I think the API docs are read more than the JLS (although perhaps not by language designers), so things like this should probably have more prominence in the java.lang docs. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 3 '09 at 22:37

7 Answers 7

up vote 78 down vote accepted

Use the valueOf method which is automatically created for each Enum.

Verbosity.valueOf("BRIEF") == Verbosity.BRIEF

For arbitrary values start with:

public static Verbosity findByAbbr(String abbr){
    for(Verbosity v : values()){
        if( v.abbr().equals(abbr)){
            return v;
        }
    }
    return null;
}

Only move on later to Map implementation if your profiler tells you to.

I know it's iterating over all the values, but with only 3 enum values it's hardly worth any other effort, in fact unless you have a lot of values I wouldn't bother with a Map it'll be fast enough.

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thanks - and I can use case conversion if I know the values are still distinct –  peter.murray.rust Jul 5 '09 at 10:21

You're close. For arbitrary values, try something like the following:

   public enum Day { 
        MONDAY("M"), TUESDAY("T"), WEDNESDAY("W"),
        THURSDAY("R"), FRIDAY("F"), SATURDAY("Sa"), SUNDAY("Su"), ;

        private final String abbreviation;
        // Reverse-lookup map for getting a day from an abbreviation
        private static final Map<String, Day> lookup = new HashMap<String, Day>();
        static {
            for (Day d : Day.values())
                lookup.put(d.getAbbreviation(), d);
        }

        private Day(String abbreviation) {
            this.abbreviation = abbreviation;
        }

        public String getAbbreviation() {
            return abbreviation;
        }

        public static Day get(String abbreviation) {
            return lookup.get(abbreviation);
        }
    }
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2  
instead of "EnumSet.allOf(Day.class)" you can use "Day.values()"... –  Carlos Heuberger Jul 3 '09 at 21:37
    
Ah, so I can. Thanks. –  Lyle Jul 3 '09 at 21:39
2  
Due to classloader issues this method will not work reliable. I do not recommend it and I have seen it fail regularly because the lookup map is not ready before being accessed. You need to put the "lookup" outside of the enum or in another class so that it will load first. –  Adam Gent Jul 18 '12 at 16:00

@Lyle's answer is rather dangerous and I have seen it not work particularly if you make the enum a static inner class. Instead I have used something like this which will load the BootstrapSingleton maps before the enums.

Load me first:

   public final class BootstrapSingleton {

        // Reverse-lookup map for getting a day from an abbreviation
        public static final Map<String, Day> lookup = new HashMap<String, Day>();
   }

Now load it in the enum constructor:

   public enum Day { 
        MONDAY("M"), TUESDAY("T"), WEDNESDAY("W"),
        THURSDAY("R"), FRIDAY("F"), SATURDAY("Sa"), SUNDAY("Su"), ;

        private final String abbreviation;

        private Day(String abbreviation) {
            this.abbreviation = abbreviation;
            BootstrapSingleton.lookup.put(abbreviation, this);
        }

        public String getAbbreviation() {
            return abbreviation;
        }

        public static Day get(String abbreviation) {
            return lookup.get(abbreviation);
        }
    }

If you have an inner enum you can just define the Map above the enum definition and that (in theory) should get loaded before.

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And you can't use valueOf()?

Edit: Btw, there is nothing stopping you from using static { } in an enum.

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Or the synthetic valueOf on the enum class, so you don't need to specify the enum class Class. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 3 '09 at 21:34
    
Of course, it just didn't have a javadoc entry so it was hard to link to. –  Fredrik Jul 3 '09 at 22:03
    
you can link to the JLS: java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/third_edition/html/… –  newacct Jul 4 '09 at 2:38
    
Fixed, thank you. –  Fredrik Jul 4 '09 at 5:58
    
You can use valueOf() but the name must match identically to that set in the enum declaration. Either of the two lookup methods above can be modified to use .equalsIgnoringCase() and have little more robustness to error. –  leonardo Jun 22 '12 at 2:15

In the Java Language Specification 7 there is an a example! that reflects your question on initialization of the map with self-references.

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Perhaps, take a look at this. Its working for me. The purpose of this is to lookup 'RED' with '/red_color'. Declaring a static map and loading the enums into it only once would bring some performance benefits if the enums are many.

public class Mapper {

public enum Maps {

    COLOR_RED("/red_color", "RED");

    private final String code;
    private final String description;
    private static Map<String, String> mMap;

    private Maps(String code, String description) {
        this.code = code;
        this.description = description;
    }

    public String getCode() {
        return name();
    }

    public String getDescription() {
        return description;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name();
    }

    public static String getColorName(String uri) {
        if (mMap == null) {
            initializeMapping();
        }
        if (mMap.containsKey(uri)) {
            return mMap.get(uri);
        }
        return null;
    }

    private static void initializeMapping() {
        mMap = new HashMap<String, String>();
        for (Maps s : Maps.values()) {
            mMap.put(s.code, s.description);
        }
    }
}
}

Please put in your opinons.

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You can use the Enum::valueOf() function as suggested by Gareth Davis & Brad Mace above, but make sure you handle the IllegalArgumentException that would be thrown if the string used is not present in the enum.

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  Eric Brown Oct 10 '13 at 14:59

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