Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Say I have two view models that each have an observable property that represents different, but similar data.

function site1Model(username) {
    this.username = ko.observable(username);
    ....
}

function site2Model(username) = {
    this.username = ko.observable(username);
    ....
}

These view models are independent and not necessarily linked to each other, but in some cases, a third view model creates a link between them.

function site3Model(username) = {
    this.site1 = new site1Model(username);
    this.site2 = new site2Model(username);
    // we now need to ensure that the usernames are kept the same between site1/2
    ...
}

Here are some options that I've come up with.

  1. Use a computed observable that reads one and writes to both:

    site3Model.username = ko.computed({
        read: function() {
            return this.site1.username();    // assume they are always the same
        },
        write: function(value) {
            this.site1.username(value);
            this.site2.username(value);
        },
        owner: site3Model
    }
    

    This will keep the values in sync as long as changes always come through the computed. But if an underlying observable is changed directly, it won't do so.

  2. Use the subscribe method to update each from the other:

    site3Model.site1.username.subscribe(function(value) {
        this.site2.username(value);
    }, site3Model);
    site3Model.site2.username.subscribe(function(value) {
        this.site1.username(value);
    }, site3Model);
    

    This works as long as the observables suppress notifications when the values are the same; otherwise you'd end up with an infinite loop. You could also do the check earlier: if (this.site1.username() !== value) this.site1.username(value); This also has a problem that the observables have to be simple (it won't work right if site1 and site2 themselves are observables).

  3. Use computed to do the subscribe and updates:

    site3Model.username1Updater = ko.computed(function() {
        this.site1.username(this.site2.username());
    }, site3Model);
    site3Model.username2Updater = ko.computed(function() {
        this.site2.username(this.site1.username());
    }, site3Model);
    

    This format allows us to have other dependencies. For example, we could make site1 and site2 observables and then use this.site1().username(this.site2().username()); This method also requires a check for equality to avoid an infinite loop. If we can't depend on the observable to do it, we could check within the computed, but would add another dependency on the observable we're updating (until something like observable.peek is available). This method also has the downside of running the update code once initially to set up the dependencies (since that's how computed works).

Since I feel that all of these methods have a downside, is there another way to do this that would be simple (less than 10 lines of code), efficient (not run unnecessary code or updates), and flexible (handle multiple levels of observables)?

share|improve this question

It is not exactly 10 lines of code (although you could strip it down to your liking), but I use pub/sub messages between view models for this situation.

Here is a small library that I wrote for it: https://github.com/rniemeyer/knockout-postbox

The basic idea is just to create a ko.subscribable and use topic-based subscriptions. The library extends subscribables to add subscribeTo, publishOn and syncWith (both publish and subscribe on a topic). These methods will set up the proper subscriptions for an observable to automatically participate in this messaging and stay synchronized with the topic.

Now your view models do not need to have direct references to each other and can communicate through the pubsub system. You can refactor your view models without breaking anything.

Like I said you could strip it down to less than 10 lines of code. The library just adds some extras like being able to unsubscribe, being able to have control over when publishing actually happens (equalityComparer), and you can specify a transform to run on incoming values.

Feel free to post any feedback.

Here is a basic sample: http://jsfiddle.net/rniemeyer/mg3hj/

share|improve this answer
    
Cool. It looks like you just uploaded that project. I'll probably find some uses for it. But I think that for my question, it's not so good. The publish method requires modifying the independent view models and imposes a dependency (published name) between them. – Michael Best May 30 '12 at 3:17
    
Yes, I guess if your goal is to have a 3rd party (view model) keep the other two in sync with each other, then maybe the library is not perfect for that situation. Of your options, I think that subscriptions to each other would work pretty well. You could add an extension that takes in an observable to stay in sync with that sets up both subscriptions. At least you could reuse it then. It might even be similar to the postbox idea, it would just use the actual observables rather than topics. – RP Niemeyer May 30 '12 at 3:23
    
Another thought about using pub/sub. I suppose that your third view model could be the one to add the subscriptions and manage the topic. Then, the individual view models would not need to change or even know that they are participating in that syncing. – RP Niemeyer May 30 '12 at 3:31
    
Ryan, can you take a look at the solution I came up with and let me know what you think? – Michael Best May 31 '12 at 20:23
    
Love the knockout-postbox library! I recommend it to anyone needing to sync variables or create dependencies without modifying the ko.computed() function. – gbmhunter Dec 7 '13 at 21:44
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Ryan and John, Thank you both for your answers. Unfortunately, I really don't want to introduce a global naming system that the pub/sub systems require.

Ryan, I agree that the subscribe method is probably the best. I've put together a set of functions to handle the subscription. I'm not using an extension because I also want to handle the case where the observables themselves might be dynamic. These functions accept either observables or functions that return observables. If the source observable is dynamic, I wrap the accessor function call in a computed observable to have a fixed observable to subscribe to.

function subscribeObservables(source, target, dontSetInitially) {
    var sourceObservable = ko.isObservable(source) 
            ? source 
            : ko.computed(function(){ return source()(); }),
        isTargetObservable = ko.isObservable(target),
        callback = function(value) {
            var targetObservable = isTargetObservable ? target : target(); 
            if (targetObservable() !== value)
                targetObservable(value);
        };
    if (!dontSetInitially)
        callback(sourceObservable());
    return sourceObservable.subscribe(callback);
}

function syncObservables(primary, secondary) {
    subscribeObservables(primary, secondary);
    subscribeObservables(secondary, primary, true);
}

This is about 20 lines, so maybe my target of less than 10 lines was a bit unreasonable. :-)

I modified Ryan's postbox example to demonstrate the above functions: http://jsfiddle.net/mbest/vcLFt/

share|improve this answer
    
I like it. Seems like it would work well for your scenario where you have a component that is managing the subscriptions for the other view models. At least the individual view models don't have direct references to each other. The dynamic observable wrapped in a computed is interesting. – RP Niemeyer Jun 1 '12 at 2:15
    
I like the pub/sub you created and how its decoupled. But I don;t like passing in the pair of observables to the syncObservables method. I'd prefer that if viewmodelA.property1 wants to pub it does so and if anyone is listening/subscribed, then it gets the value and syncs. That way you can have multiple viewmodels listening to each other instead of just a pair. – John Papa Jun 6 '12 at 13:07
    
@Michael Best Thanks for this. Just what I needed. I have a menubar in one view model and a data table in another. Now I can easily click a menu item and have the data table change accordingly. – DavidHyogo Feb 27 '13 at 2:59

Another option is to create an isolated datacontext that maintains the models of observables. the viewmodels all look to the datacontext for their data and refer to the same objects, so when one updates, they all do. The VM's dependency is on the datacontext, but not on other VMs. I've been doing this lately and it has worked well. Although, it is much more complex than using pub/sub.

If you want simple pub/sub, you can use Ryan Niemyer's library that he mentioned or use amplify.js which has pub/sub messaging (basically a messenger or event aggregator) built in. Both are lightweight and decoupled.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer and letting me know about Amplify. However, I need something that's completely local, without the need for a global topic string. What do you think of my solution? – Michael Best May 31 '12 at 20:22

In case anyone needed. Another option is to create a reference object/observable. This also handle object that contains multiple observable.

(function(){
    var subscriptions = [];

    ko.helper = {
        syncObject: function (topic, obj) {
            if(subscriptions[topic]){
                return subscriptions[topic];
            } else {
                return subscriptions[topic] = obj;
            }
        }
    };
})();

In your view models.

function site1Model(username) {
    this.username = syncObject('username', ko.observable());
    this.username(username);
    ....
}

function site2Model(username) = {
    this.username = syncObject('username', ko.observable());
    this.username(username);
    ....
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.