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I use 2 tables to combine data to become like shown as below

SELECT name, price, MIN(price) AS minprice 
FROM c, cp 
WHERE c.id = cp.id 
GROUP BY id 
ORDER BY minprice = 0, minprice ASC

For Example:

id     name         price
 1     apple          0
 1     green apple    20
 2     orange         10
 3     strawberry     0

As the data result above the minprice of the group 1 is 0 But I don't want the min price take zero, but this is incorrenct if I give condition having minprice > 0 cause

I wanna my result become like this

2  orange         10 
1  green apple    20
3  strawberry      0

Is it possible?

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1 Answer 1

Here is the answer:

SELECT 
    (
     SELECT name 
     FROM yourtable 
     WHERE price = _inner._MIN AND id = _inner.id LIMIT 1
    ) 
    AS _NAME, 
    _inner._MIN
FROM 
    (
     SELECT id, IFNULL(MIN(NULLIF(price, 0)),0) AS _MIN 
     FROM yourtable 
     GROUP BY id
    ) 
    AS _inner

where yourtable is the name of your table.

MIN(NULLIF(price, 0)) allows you to calculate minimum value while not counting a zero.

IFNULL(<...>,0) here just means, that we need a real zero instead of NULL in result.

LIMIT 1 is on the case if we have an items with the same id and price but with different names. I think, you can freely remove this statement.

share|improve this answer
    
halo, what for '_inner._MIN' use? –  user610983 May 30 '12 at 7:42
    
It's just a field in the returned _inner subtable designating calculated field with a minimum item's price. Returned subtable _inner acts as a virtual table, except that we ourselves define from which fields it will consist. –  gahcep May 30 '12 at 8:44
    
_MIN is just an alias for the IFNULL(MIN(NULLIF(price, 0)),0) field. –  gahcep May 30 '12 at 8:54

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