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I have always been told that compiler is sufficient smart to eliminate dead code. Much of the code that I am writing has a lot of information known at compile time but the code has to be written in most generic form. I don't know any assembly so I cannot examine the generated assembly. What kind of code that can be effectively eliminated in the final executable?

Few examples but not limited to

f(bool b){
 if(b){
  //some code
 }else{
  //some code
 }
}
f(true);
//////////////////////////
template<bool b>
f(){
 if(b){
  //some code
 }else{
  //some code
 }
}
f<true>();
///////////////////////////

What if definition of f is in other objective code and the the called f(true) is in main. Will link time optimisation effectively eliminate the dead code? What is the coding style/compiler option/trick to facilitate dead code elimination?

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2  
You should read How can I know which parts in the code are never used?. – Jesse Good May 30 '12 at 3:04
    
@JesseGood This is helpful! thanks. But I dont need to know which code is dead, I just want to make sure they are not compiled into the final executable. In fact I know on purpose which part of the code is dead by design when I write the caller code. – leon May 30 '12 at 3:09

Typically, if you're compiling with the -O flag on the following flags are turned on:

      -fauto-inc-dec 
      -fcompare-elim 
      -fcprop-registers 
      -fdce  
      [...]

-fdce stands for Dead Code Elimination. I'd suggest you compile your binaries with and without (i.e. by turning off explicitly) this option to make sure if your binaries are as optimized as you'd like them to be.

Read about the different passes of the compiler:

  • SSA Aggressive Dead Code Elimination. Turned on by the `-fssa-dce' option. This pass performs elimination of code considered unnecessary because it has no externally visible effects on the program. It operates in linear time.

As for helping the linker with dead code elimination go through this presentation. Two major takeaways being:

Compile your modules with -ffunction-sections -fdata-sections – there are no downsides to it!

  • This includes static libraries, not just binaries – make it possible for users of your library to benefit from more efficient dead code removal.
  • Link your binaries with --gc-sections, unless you have to link against nasty third-party static library which uses magic sections.

You may also want to take a look at this GCC bug (to see what chances of optimization may be missed and why).

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Question: In the docs, they use the acronym "RTL", what does that stand for? – Jesse Good May 30 '12 at 3:22
3  
@*:RTL = Register Transfer Language is a Lisp-inspired low-level intermediate language (one of the three used by GCC) used (along with another called GIMPLE) for optimization purposes. – dirkgently May 30 '12 at 3:36
    
FYI, if your code or a library needs magic sections, then the linker script should be marking those sections as KEEP. This kind of thing happens a lot in embedded development (which often needs linker scripts to define memory layout anyway), as things like exception vector tables are never called or referenced by main but need to be there for the platform. BTW, if you're building embedded code without -ffunction-sections, -fdata-sections, and --gc-sections`, you're only hurting yourself. – Mike DeSimone Oct 14 '13 at 16:48
    
Also, since --gc-sections and similar flags are relatively new and not widely supported, library writers (especially C standard library writers) would generally stick to one library function per source file, achieving a similar effect. See glibc as an example. – Mike DeSimone Oct 14 '13 at 16:53
1  
@*:How to exactly turn off "-fdce" explicitly when -O is turn on? – user3156285 Jan 27 '15 at 5:10

When I used template parameter constant in such if expression then dce (Dead Code Elimination) compiler (GCC 4.8.1 on Linux) flags did not helped and O2, O3 optimization also did not helped. I had to use template specialization wrapper:

template<bool b>
f();

template<>
f<true>(){
  //some code on true condition
}

template<>
f<false>(){
  //some code on false condition
}

Also macros can be used to avoid compilation of the unused code branch, but it depends on the compiler (whether it processed macros as they occur in the code or on precompiling stage):

template<bool b>
f(){
 #if b
  //some code
 #elif
  //some code
 #endif  // b
}
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Your example focuses on dead code elimination inside functions.

Another type of dead code elimination, is removal of entire unused symbols (functions or variables) which can be achieved with:

-fdata-sections -ffunction-sections -Wl,--gc-sections

as mentioned at: How to remove unused C/C++ symbols with GCC and ld?

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