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I would like to convert data.txt into scheme list using sed into the following format:

-Each every line with same starting number will be parsed and combined like so:

data.txt

1,{},344.233
1,{2},344.197
2,{16},290.281
2,{18},289.093
3,{1},220.896

foo.scm

(define v1 '(1 (() 344.233) ((2) 344.197))) ;; this is for first two lines starting with 1
(define v2 '(2 ((16) 290.281) ((18) 289.093))) ;; ... 2
(define v3 '(3 (() 237.558))) ;; ... 3
share|improve this question
    
What have you tried? –  ghoti May 30 '12 at 3:10
    
@ghoti: I have tried using bash and scheme to parsing it directly, however, I am not very familiar with both. I probably don't need a complete solution but something that I can start with would be fine. –  Mark May 30 '12 at 3:12
1  
why not parsing it with scheme? –  Eric Fortis May 30 '12 at 3:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I know nothing about scheme, so I'd probably do this in awk rather than sed.

[ghoti@pc ~]$ cat data.txt 
1,{},344.233
1,{2},344.197
2,{16},290.281
2,{18},289.093
3,{1},220.896
[ghoti@pc ~]$ cat doit.awk 
#!/usr/bin/awk -f

BEGIN {
  FS=",";
  last1=1;
}

$1 != last1 {
  printf("(define v%.0f '(%.0f %s))\n", last1, last1, substr(sect,2));
  last1=$1; sect="";
}

{
  gsub(/[^0-9]/,"",$2);
  sect=sprintf("%s ((%s) %s)", sect, $2, $3);
}

END {
  printf("(define v%.0f '(%.0f %s))\n", last1, last1, substr(sect,2));
}

[ghoti@pc ~]$ ./doit.awk data.txt 
(define v1 '(1 (() 344.233) ((2) 344.197)))
(define v2 '(2 ((16) 290.281) ((18) 289.093)))
(define v3 '(3 ((1) 220.896)))
[ghoti@pc ~]$ 

It could certainly be written more tightly, but this gets the job done.

UPDATE: (per comments)

[ghoti@pc ~]$ tail -1 data.txt 
3,{1,3,4},220.896
[ghoti@pc ~]$ diff -u doit.awk doitnew.awk 
--- doit.awk    2012-05-30 00:38:34.549680376 -0400
+++ doitnew.awk 2012-05-30 00:38:52.893810815 -0400
@@ -10,8 +10,15 @@
   last1=$1; sect="";
 }

+$2 !~ /}$/ {
+  while ($2 !~ /}$/) {
+    pos=match($0, /,[0-9,]+}/);
+    $0=substr($0, 0, pos-1) " " substr($0, pos+1);
+  }
+}
+
 {
-  gsub(/[^0-9]/,"",$2);
+  gsub(/[^0-9 ]/,"",$2);
   sect=sprintf("%s ((%s) %s)", sect, $2, $3);
 }

[ghoti@pc ~]$ ./doitnew.awk data.txt 
(define v1 '(1 (() 344.233) ((2) 344.197)))
(define v2 '(2 ((16) 290.281) ((18) 289.093)))
(define v3 '(3 ((1 3 4) 220.896)))
[ghoti@pc ~]$ 

What's going on here?

In the new block we're adding, test to see whether the second field ends in a }. If it doesn't, we'll loop until it does. For each run of the loop, we'll remove a comma before the }, replacing it with a space.

Sometimes, brute-force works. :-P

share|improve this answer
    
I have a small problem, there are some line where the brace brackets have one or more items like this 3,{1,3,4},220.896 how would I modify your code to do that? –  Mark May 30 '12 at 4:19
    
How do you want that situation dealt with? (define v3 '(1,3,4 ((1) 220.896)))? –  ghoti May 30 '12 at 4:20
    
So it would be like (define v3 '(3 ((1 3 4) 220.896))) –  Mark May 30 '12 at 4:21
    
That's tricky, because awk is just using commas as field separators. I'll try something and update my answer. –  ghoti May 30 '12 at 4:22
1  
Thanks so much, I am going to learn how to use awk now. –  Mark May 30 '12 at 4:49

In racket (a.k.a. scheme):

#lang racket

;; parse a line (we will join them later)
(define (line-parse l)
  (match (regexp-match #px"([0-9]+),\\{([0-9,]*)\\},([0-9.]+)" l)
    [(list dc first-num bracket-nums rest)
     (list (string->number first-num)
           (match bracket-nums
             ["" empty]
             [else (map string->number
                        (regexp-split #px"," bracket-nums))])
           (string->number rest))]
    [else
     (error "unexpected line format in line: ~s\n" l)]))

;; join together lines that start with the same number
(define (join-lines lines)
  (cond [(empty? lines) empty]
        [else (join-lines-of-n (first (first lines)) 
                               lines
                               empty)]))

;; gather together lines starting with 'n':
(define (join-lines-of-n n lines accum)
  (cond [(empty? lines)
         (list (cons n (reverse accum)))]
        [(equal? (first (first lines)) n)
         (join-lines-of-n n (rest lines) (cons (rest (first lines))
                                               accum))]
        [else
         (cons (cons n (reverse accum))
               (join-lines lines))]))

(define (dress-up line)
  (format "~a\n" `(define ,(format "v~s" (first line))
                  ',line)))


(display 
 (apply 
  string-append
  (map dress-up 
       (join-lines
        (map line-parse
             (sequence->list (in-port read-line)))))))

Save this as rewrite.rkt, run it like this:

oiseau:/tmp clements> racket ./rewrite.rkt < foo.txt
(define v1 (quote (1 (() 344.233) ((2) 344.197))))
(define v2 (quote (2 ((16) 290.281) ((18) 289.093))))
(define v3 (quote (3 ((1) 220.896) ((4 5) 2387.278))))

... note that I added a {4,5} line to the input example to test your extension.

also, note that the output uses (quote ...) rather than '(...). This "should work fine"; that is, Scheme readers produce the same output for these two forms, and the resulting file should work fine as scheme input.

If this were my code, I think I wouldn't do the (define v1 ...) dance, and just write the thing out as a big piece of data that a scheme/racket program can slurp in with a single "read", but that's your choice, not mine. Also, there's some ambiguity in your specification re: the uniqueness of the initial indexes; that is, you might "go back" to an earlier line number. For instance, what should be the output when given this input file:

3,{1},1.0
4,{1},1.0
3,{1},1.0

?

Also, note that I chopped out all of the test cases in order to make it look shorter/prettier :).

EDIT: OH! Gather the lines this way, instead. It'll actually be a bit slower, but it reads much more nicely:

#lang racket

;; parse a line (we will join them later)
(define (line-parse l)
  (match (regexp-match #px"([0-9]+),\\{([0-9,]*)\\},([0-9.]+)" l)
    [(list dc first-num bracket-nums rest)
     (list (string->number first-num)
           (match bracket-nums
             ["" empty]
             [else (map string->number
                        (regexp-split #px"," bracket-nums))])
           (string->number rest))]
    [else
     (error "unexpected line format in line: ~s\n" l)]))

;; does the line start with the number k?
(define ((starts-with k) l) (equal? (first l) k))

;; join together lines starting with the same thing:
(define (join-lines lines)
  (for/list ([k (remove-duplicates (map first lines))])
    (cons k (map rest (filter (starts-with k) lines)))))

(define (dress-up line)
  (format "~a\n" `(define ,(format "v~s" (first line))
                  ',line)))


(display 
 (apply 
  string-append
  (map dress-up 
       (join-lines
        (map line-parse
             (sequence->list (in-port read-line)))))))
share|improve this answer

This might work for you (GNU sed):

 sed ':a;$!N;s/^\(\([^,])*\).*\)\n\2/\1/;ta;h;x;s/\n.*//;s/,{\([^}]*\)},\([^,]\+\)/ ((\1) \2)/g;s/,/ /g;s/^\([^ ]*\).*/(define v\1 '\''(&)) ;;...\1/p;x;D' file

Explanation:

  • Reduce like values to a single line :a;$!N;s/^\(\([^,])*\).*\)\n\2/\1/;ta
  • Copy pattern space (PS) to hold space (HS). h
  • Swap to HS x
  • Chop off previous line. s/\n.*//
  • Formulate lists. s/,{\([^}]*\)},\([^,]\+\)/ ((\1) \2)/g
  • Replace any remaining ,'s with spaces. s/,/ /g
  • Surround lists with function definition and comments and print. s/^\([^ ]*\).*/(define v\1 '\''(&)) ;;...\1/p
  • Swap back to PS. x
  • Delete upto previous line and repeat. D
share|improve this answer
    
... NO CARRIER ;-) –  ghoti May 30 '12 at 14:07

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