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I'm a complete newbie in Haskell. One thing that always bugs me is the ambiguity in whether Haskell is a managed(term borrowed from MS) language like Java or a compile-to-native code like C?

The GHC page says this "GHC compiles Haskell code either directly to native code or using LLVM as a back-end".

In the case of "compiled to native code", how can features like garbage collection be possible without something like a JVM?

/Update/

Thanks so much for your answer. Conceptually, can you please help point out which one of my following understandings of garbage collection in Haskell is correct:

GHC compiles Haskell code to native code. In the processing of compiling, garbage collection routines will be added to the original program code?

OR

There is a program that runs along side a Haskell program to perform garbage collection?

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11  
Why would you need a VM for garbage collection? –  sepp2k May 30 '12 at 3:41
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When Microsoft says "Managed", I'm pretty sure they are referring not to Java, but to CLI-hosted languages, as distinct from "native code". –  Arafangion May 30 '12 at 4:04
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Not to beat the dead horse, but you can garbage collect C code (PDF). –  Thomas M. DuBuisson May 30 '12 at 4:16
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There are a couple problems. Almost any language can be either byte-compiled or compiled to native code, C# can be compiled to native code if you like. And plain old C can be interpreted (there exist C interpreters! wacky!). So it has nothing to do with the language itself, it is all about implementations. It is kind of like asking whether English is a native language -- some people are native English speakers and some people learned English as a foreign language. It has nothing to do with English itself. –  Dietrich Epp May 30 '12 at 6:52
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@TommyQ: look at it this way: if a programmer has as much control over the exact native code that is produced, then making a good GC is hard (but not impossible, as it has been demonstrated). With GHC you (probably) have much less control about the exact native code that is generated, so the compiler is free to add whatever tricks it needs to implement a good GC without a virtual machine. The difference is simply that in a .NET application the GC lives in the runtime and the VM, while in the compiled Haskell code it lives in the runtim and the compiled code. –  Joachim Sauer May 30 '12 at 8:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

As far as I am aware the term "managed language" specifically means a language that targets .NET/the Common Language Runtime. So no, Haskell is not a managed language and neither is Java.

Regarding what Haskell is compiled to: As the documentation you quoted says, GHC compiles Haskell to native code. It can do so by either directly emitting native code or by first emitting LLVM code and then letting LLVM compile that to native code. Either way the end result of running GHC is a native executable.

Besides GHC there are also other implementations of Haskell - most notably Hugs, which is a pure interpreter that never produces an executable (native or otherwise).

how can features like garbage collection be possible without something like a JVM?

The same way that they're possible with the JVM: Every time memory is allocated, it is registered with the garbage collector. Then from time to time the garbage collector runs, following the steps of the given garbage collection algorithm. GHC-compiled code uses generational garbage collection.


In response to your edit:

GHC compiles Haskell code to native code. In the processing of compiling, garbage collection routines will be added to the original program code?

Basically. Except that saying "garbage collection routines will be added to the original program code" might paint the wrong picture. The GC routines are just part of the library that every Haskell program is linked against. The compiled code simply contains calls to those routines at the appropriate places.

Basically all there is to it is to call the GC's alloc function every time you would otherwise call malloc.

Just look at any GC library for C and how it's used: All you need to do is to #include the library's header and link against the library, and replace each occurence of malloc with the GC library's alloc function (and remove all calls to free) and bam, your code is garbage collected.

There is a program that runs along side a Haskell program to perform garbage collection?

No.

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>All you need to do is to #include the library's header and link against the library, and replace each occurence of malloc with the GC library's alloc function (and remove all calls to free) and bam, your code is garbage collected.<br/> Thanks, this is very clear. –  TommyQ May 30 '12 at 7:13

whether Haskell is a managed(term borrowed from MS) language like Java

GHC-compiled programs include a garbage collector. (As far as I know, all implementations of Haskell include garbage collection, but this is not part of the specification.)

or a compile-to-native code like C?

GHC-compiled programs are compiled to native code. Hugs interprets programs, and does not compile to native code. There are several other implementations which all, as far as I know, compile to native code, but I list these separately because I'm not as confident of this fact.

In the case of "compiled to native code", how can features like garbage collection be possible without something like a JVM?

GHC-compiled programs include a runtime system that provides some basic capabilities like M-to-N green threading, garbage collection, and an IO manager. In a sense, this is a bit like having "something like a JVM" in that it provides many of the same features, but it's very different in implementation: there is no common bytecode across all architectures (and hence no "virtual machine").

which one of my following understandings of garbage collection in Haskell is correct:

  1. GHC compiles Haskell code to native code. In the processing of compiling, garbage collection routines will be added to the original program code?
  2. There is a program that runs along side a Haskell program to perform garbage collection?

Case 1 is correct: the runtime system code is added to the program code during compilation.

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2  
Language-specific runtimes existed for some time. Turbo Pascal had one, if I remember correctly. And one could argue that libc is the "C-specific runtime" ;-) –  Joachim Sauer May 30 '12 at 6:21
    
@JoachimSauer: Better yet, there is a C runtime on many platforms. On Linux/ELF, it contains the definition for the _start function, which calls main. –  Dietrich Epp May 30 '12 at 6:48
    
@JoachimSauer Absolutely; I didn't intend to imply that this was a new idea! –  Daniel Wagner May 30 '12 at 6:59
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@DanielWagner: I know, I just wanted to clarify for anyone who thought that "language runtime" implies "virtual machine". –  Joachim Sauer May 30 '12 at 7:03
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@TommyQ That's fine and all, but the C language runtime is not a virtual machine, the Turbo Pascal language runtime is not a virtual machine, the Haskell language runtime is not a virtual machine, ... –  Daniel Wagner May 30 '12 at 7:54

What, for you, is the defining feature of a "managed language"? The phrase "GHC compiles Haskell code either directly to native code or using LLVM as a back-end" that you quote is quite clear about what GHC does, so I suspect the "ambiguity" that bugs you is rather in the term "managed language" than in GHC's docs.

In the case of "compiled to native code", how can features like garbage collection be possible without something like a JVM?

How exactly do you think "something like a JVM" implements features like garbage collection? The JVM isn't magic, it's just a program like everything else. At some level you need to have native code in order for the CPU to execute it, so clearly features like garbage collection are possible in native code.

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yes JVM is a program that executes java byte codes. In the case of C, the CPU executes the compiled code directly without having a VM in between. My question is How Haskell does garbage collection without something executing between compiled Haskell code and the CPU? –  TommyQ May 30 '12 at 6:26
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In the same way the VM in between would do it; code is compiled into the program that keeps track of memory and checks every now and then to see if any of it can be reclaimed (this is at a very very general level, of course; there is a lot of scope for variability in the details of how "keeping track of memory", "checking every now and then" and "reclaiming" are implemented). Remember, the JVM itself is compiled native code; anything it can do, other compiled native code can do. –  Ben May 30 '12 at 7:11

For where you currently are, it's probably best to think of (GHC) Haskell as "managed," but that the platform GHC compiles to is not targeted by anything else. There is, of course, more to it than that, but that's a sufficient explanation in lieu of more Haskell experience.

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That's totally misleading. The result of running GHC on a Haskell program is native code, not C-- or any kind of VM code. Whatever representation is used by GHC internally is hardly relevant to the end result. –  sepp2k May 30 '12 at 4:16
    
@sepp2k But you can do things like output external core, or LLVM IR, the second of which can be interpreted (or JIT compiled) later. This is just like the MS C# compiler having an ahead-of-time option, except that GHC happens to make that the default. The internal representation is exactly what he's asking about, because that's how a traditional VM-hosted language works: by exposing and persisting the compiler's internal representation. –  Ptharien's Flame May 30 '12 at 4:38

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