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I'm writing some code in CUDA (Huffman algorithm to be exact, but it's totally irrelevant to the case). I've got a file Paralellel.cu with two functions: one (WriteDictionary) is an ordinary function, the second (wrtDict) is a special CUDA _global_ function running in CUDA GPU. Here are bodies of these functions:

//I know body of this function looks kinda not-related 
//   to program main topic, but it's just for tests.
__global__ void wrtDict(Node** nodes, unsigned char* str)
{
    int i = threadIdx.x;

    Node* n = nodes[i];
    char c = n->character;

    str[6 * i] = 1;//c;                         !!!
    str[6 * i + 1] = 2;

    str[6 * i + 2] = 0;
    str[6 * i + 3] = 0;
    str[6 * i + 4] = 0;
    str[6 * i + 5] = 0;
}

I know these two first lines seem pointless, since I don't use this object n of Node class here, but just let them be for a while. And there's a super secret comment marked by "!!!". Here is WriteDictionary:

void WriteDictionary(NodeList* nodeList, unsigned char* str)
{
    Node** nodes = nodeList->elements;   
    int N = nodeList->getCount();

    Node** cudaNodes;
    unsigned char* cudaStr;

    cudaMalloc((void**)&cudaStr, 6 * N * sizeof(unsigned char));
    cudaMalloc((void**)&cudaNodes, N * sizeof(Node*));

    cudaMemcpy(cudaStr, str, 6 * N * sizeof(char), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice); 
    cudaMemcpy(cudaNodes, nodes, N * sizeof(Node*), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);

    dim3 block(1);
    dim3 thread(N);

    std::cout << N << "\n";

    wrtDict<<<block,thread>>>(cudaNodes, cudaStr);

    cudaMemcpy(str, cudaStr, 6 * N * sizeof(unsigned char), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);


    cudaFree(cudaNodes);
    cudaFree(cudaStr);
}

As one can see, the function WriteDictionary is kind of a proxy between CUDA and rest of the program. I've got a bunch of objects of my class Node somewhere in an ordinary memory pointed by the Node * array elements keeped within my object NodeList. For now it's enough to know about Node, that it has a public field char character. A char * str for now is going to be filled with some test data. It contains 6 * N allocated memory for chars, where N = count of all elements in the elements array. So I allocate in CUDA a memory space for 6 * N chars and N Node pointers. Then I copy there my Node pointers, they're still pointing to an ordinary memory. I'm running the function. Within the function wrtDict I'm extracting character into char c variable and this time NOT trying to put it into output array str.

So, when I'm writing a content of output array str (outside WriteDictionary function), I'm getting perfectly correct answer, i.e.:

1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0   1  2  0  0  0  0 
1  2  0  0  0  0

Yeah, here we've got 39 correct sixes of chars (shown in hex). BUT when we slightly change our super secret comment within wrtDict function, like this:

__global__ void wrtDict(Node** nodes, unsigned char* str)
{
    int i = threadIdx.x;

    Node* n = nodes[i];
    char c = n->character;

    str[6 * i] = c;//1;                         !!!
    str[6 * i + 1] = 2;

    str[6 * i + 2] = 0;
    str[6 * i + 3] = 0;
    str[6 * i + 4] = 0;
    str[6 * i + 5] = 0;
}

we will see strange things. I'm now expecting the first char of every six to be a character from Node pointed by the array - each one different. Or, even if it fails, I'm expecting only the first char of every six to be messed up, but the rest of them left intact: ? 2 0 0 0 0. But NO! When I do this EVERYTHING completely messes up, and now content of an output array str looks like this:

70 21 67 b7 70 21  67 b7  0  0  0  0 
 0  0  0  0 18 d7  85  8 b8 d7 85  8 
78 d7 85  8 38 d9  85  8 d8 d7 85  8 
f8 d5 85  8 58 d6  85  8 d8 d5 85  8 
78 d6 85  8 b8 d6  85  8 98 d7 85  8 
98 d6 85  8 38 d6  85  8 d8 d6 85  8 
38 d5 85  8 18 d6  85  8 f8 d6 85  8 
58 d9 85  8 f8 d7  85  8 78 d9 85  8 
98 d9 85  8 d8 d4  85  8 b8 d8 85  8 
38 d8 85  8 38 d7  85  8 78 d8 85  8 
f8 d8 85  8 d8 d8  85  8 18 d5 85  8 
61 20 75 6c 74 72  69 63 65 73 20 6d 
6f 6c 65 73 74 69  65 20 73 69 74 20 
61 6d 65 74 20 69  64 20 73 61 70 69 
65 6e 2e 20 4d 61  75 72 69 73 20 73 
61 70 69 65 6e 20  65 73 74 2c 20 64 
69 67 6e 69 73 73  69 6d 20 61 63 20 
70 6f 72 74 61 20  75 74 2c 20 76 75 
6c 70 75 74 61 74  65 20 61 63 20 61 
6e 74 65 2e 20 46 

I'm asking now - why? Is it because I tried to reach an ordinary memory from within CUDA GPU? I'm getting a warning, probably about exactly this case, saying:

Cannot tell what pointer points to, assuming global memory space

I've googled about this, found only this, that CUDA it's reaching exactly an ordinary memory, cause couldn't find out where to reach, and this warning in 99.99% should be ignored. So I'm ignoring it, thinking it'll be fine, but it isn't - is my case within that 0.01%?

How can I solve this problem? I know I could just copy Nodes, not pointers to them, into CUDA, but I assume copying them would cost me more time than I save paralellizing what's being done to them inside. I could also extract character from every Node, put them all into an array and then copy it to CUDA, but - the same problem as in the previous statement.

I just completely don't know what to do and, what's worse, deadline of CUDA project in my college is today, apx. 17pm (I just haven't got enough time to make it earlier, damn it...).

PS. If it helps: I'm compiling using pretty simple (no any switches) command:

nvcc -o huff ArchiveManager.cpp IOManager.cpp Node.cpp NodeList.cpp Program.cpp Paraleller.cu
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3  
For all the (mostly irrelevant) information you have posted there are lots of critical things missing. If you are unwilling to explain the structure Node or what the "super secret comment " is, I very much doubt anyoone can help you. I am voting to close this question, it is very poorly written (despite its length) and a solution to it is extremely unlikely to be of benefit to others - it is too localised. –  talonmies May 30 '12 at 7:55
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2 Answers

This is a terrible question, see talonmies' comment.

  1. Check the error values from every CUDA API call. You will get a launch failure message on the cudaMemcpy after your kernel launch
  2. Run cuda-memcheck to help debug the error (which is basically a segmentation fault)
  3. Realise that you are dereferencing a (unmapped) pointer into host memory from the GPU, you need to copy the nodes, not just the pointers to the nodes
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To expand a little... You can't just memcpy structure with pointers to the GPU. Why? Because only the structure will be in GPU memory. The pointer will still pointing at CPU memory, which the GPU can't access. You either need to separately upload all the little bits of your structures, changing the pointers, or use a different data structure that involves no or fewer pointers. –  Peter May 30 '12 at 13:45
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You can also run your program from inside cuda-gdb. cuda-gdb will show you what error you're hitting. Also, right at the beginning in cuda-gdb, do a "set cuda memcheck on", it will turn on memcheck inside cuda-gdb.

In the latest cuda-gdb version (5.0 as of today), you can also see warnings if you're not checking return codes from API calls and those API calls are failing.

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