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Question:

I am using closure tables to track user file permissions, and, after a JOIN, this results in multiple read booleans across multiple rows. I want to only select a row, if all of the joined rows are readable. Using UNION obviously does not achieve this.

Details:

Folders table:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS folders
(
   id                    INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
   path                  VARCHAR(500) NOT NULL,
   r                     BOOL NOT NULL DEFAULT FALSE,
   PRIMARY KEY ( id )
)engine=innodb;

Files table:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS files
(
   id                    INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
   parent_folder_id      INT NOT NULL ,
   path                  VARCHAR(500) NOT NULL,
   r                     BOOL NOT NULL DEFAULT FALSE,
   FOREIGN KEY ( parent_folder_id ) REFERENCES folders ( id ),
   PRIMARY KEY ( id )
)engine=innodb;

Folder-Parent Folder closure table:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS parent_folders
(
   id                INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
   folder_id         INT NOT NULL,
   parent_folder_id  INT NOT NULL,
   FOREIGN KEY ( folder_id ) REFERENCES folders ( id ),
   FOREIGN KEY ( parent_folder_id ) REFERENCES folders ( id ),
   PRIMARY KEY ( id )
)engine=innodb;

Now, if I want to get all the readable files (ignoring for the moment that I have omitted users entirely), I would start out like so

SELECT 
    F.id, F.path, F.r, P.parent_folder_id, D.path, D.r
FROM
    files AS F 
    LEFT JOIN parent_folders AS P 
        ON F.parent_folder_id = P.folder_id 
    LEFT JOIN folders AS D  
        ON P.parent_folder_id = D.id;

This will display a table of every file id, path and read permissions, as accessible from each of its parent folders like so

id   path                  r     id  path          r
......
0   /home/joe/foo/bar.txt  True  1   /home/joe/foo True
1   /home/joe/foo/bar.txt  True  2   /home/joe     True
1   /home/joe/foo/bar.txt  True  3   /home         True
1   /home/joe/foo/bar.txt  True  4   /             True
2   /home/jim/foo/bar.txt  True  5   /home/jim/foo True
2   /home/jim/foo/bar.txt  True  6   /home/jim     False
2   /home/jim/foo/bar.txt  True  7   /home         True
2   /home/jim/foo/bar.txt  True  8   /             True
....

In this case, I would like to SELECT /home/joe/foo/bar.txt because every parent folder leading down to it is readable, but I would not want to SELECT /home/jim/foo/bar.txt because one of its parent folders is not readable.

EDIT: Alternatively, I could rephrase the question like so: "Can I AND the values of one column across multiple rows?"

share|improve this question
    
+1 for nice formatting. –  Sarfraz May 30 '12 at 5:36
1  
@Sarfraz I find if I spend an extra 15 minutes formatting, my question gets 500% more attention. –  puk May 30 '12 at 5:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It can be done with non-standard SQL but this depends on your database vendor. For example, you might want to check hierarchical queries with the CONNECT BY clause in Oracle. There may be something similar for MySQL. However, I would suggest against such a solution for three reasons:

  1. Vendor lock-in.
  2. It is not clear how efficient those queries are, or how to optimize them.
  3. The complexity increases very quickly if you want more rules like this (like inheritable user permissions for example).

Instead, I would suggest the following approach which I have used in several medium to large scale projects:

  1. For the r field use three-state booleans (TRUE, FALSE and NULL), where NULL will stand for "inherit".

  2. Add a new field effective_r for each file (and maybe for each folder). This will contain the result of applying all the inheritance rules and can only be TRUE or FALSE. Of course, you will have to calculate this field on every change of the hierarchy, but this is faster as updates are not that often and when they happen, they affect only a part of the hierarchy.

  3. Define top-down propagation rules. In this case it is easy:

    parent effective_r       child r        child effective_r
    ---------------------    ------------   ---------------------
    <ROOT>                   NULL           TRUE
    <ROOT>                   TRUE           TRUE
    <ROOT>                   FALSE          FALSE
    TRUE                     NULL           TRUE
    FALSE                    NULL           FALSE
    TRUE|FALSE               TRUE           TRUE
    TRUE|FALSE               FALSE          FALSE
    

    The rules can be much more complicated and sophisticated for user permissions.

share|improve this answer
    
what if I ask the question like this: Can I AND the columns across multiple rows? –  puk May 30 '12 at 7:03
    
wrt your answer, I think you are updating ALL file permissions on any change. A single chmod 0000 /home/joe command, albeit very unlikely, would halt the entire system. –  puk May 30 '12 at 7:08
    
@puk, yes you can, but you have to resort to vendor specific extensions. For the reasons I explained, you should better not. –  linepogl May 30 '12 at 8:35

Add a WHERE clause

WHERE D.r = TRUE

EDIT

Do improvements as you want

SELECT F.id, F.path, F.r, P.parent_folder_id, D.path, D.r
FROM files AS F
LEFT JOIN parent_folders AS P ON F.parent_folder_id = P.folder_id
LEFT JOIN folders AS D ON P.parent_folder_id = D.id
WHERE F.path NOT IN
    (SELECT A.path
     FROM files AS A
     LEFT JOIN parent_folders AS B ON A.parent_folder_id = B.folder_id
     LEFT JOIN folders AS C ON B.parent_folder_id = C.id
     WHERE C.r = FALSE)
share|improve this answer
    
I actually didn't try this, but I believe that works on a row by row bases, when what I want is to only SELECT F.id if all the D.r columns are all True. –  puk May 30 '12 at 7:01
    
check the edited query –  Darshana May 30 '12 at 8:05
    
What does this do? Shouldn't the last TRUE be FALSE, then that might work. –  puk May 30 '12 at 8:23
    
you are right I'll edit it –  Darshana May 30 '12 at 8:25
    
As I suspected this results in duplicates, is there any way to prevent this/fix this? –  puk May 31 '12 at 3:42
select a.path
from (
    SELECT 
        F.path, D.r
    FROM
        files AS F 
        LEFT JOIN parent_folders AS P 
            ON F.parent_folder_id = P.folder_id 
        LEFT JOIN folders AS D  
            ON P.parent_folder_id = D.id
) a
left join (
    SELECT 
        F.path, D.r
    FROM
        files AS F 
        LEFT JOIN parent_folders AS P 
            ON F.parent_folder_id = P.folder_id 
        LEFT JOIN folders AS D  
            ON P.parent_folder_id = D.id
) b on a.path = b.path and b.r = false
where b.r is null
group by path
share|improve this answer
    
Is this valid syntax? What are those trailing a and b letters, should there not be an AS statement? –  puk May 30 '12 at 17:14
    
I didn't test it but the manual says the AS keyword is optional. –  Clodoaldo Neto May 30 '12 at 19:22
    
I see now. ok I will test it out –  puk May 30 '12 at 19:36

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