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I was designing a generic linked list to create a linked list of Strings.
However I keep getting this error :

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: Node.<init>(Ljava/lang/Object;)V
at LinkedList.addNode(LinkedList.java:10)
at LinkedList.<init>(LinkedList.java:22)
at Trial.main(Trial.java:7)


From the stack trace , the error is generated at LinkedList's addNode() method. Im including the definition to this method as well as the definition of the Node class.
LinkedList addNode()

public void addNode(T n) {
        Node<T> temp = new Node<T>(n);
        if(start==null) {
            start = temp;
            current = start;
        } else {
            end.setNext(temp);
        }
        end =temp;
    }


Node.java

public class Node<T>{
private T n;
Node next;
Node(T n) {
    this.n = n;
    next = null;
}
public void setNext(Node nextNode) {
    next = nextNode;
}
public Node getNext() {
    return next;
}
public T getN() {
    return n;
}
@Override
public String toString() {
    if(n instanceof String)
        return n.toString();
    else {
        return T.toString();
    }
}

}



LinkedList.java

public class LinkedList<T>{
Node start;
Node end;
Node current;
private static final long serialVersionUID = 901L;
    LinkedList(T n) {
        addNode(n);
    }
    public void addNode(T n) {
        Node<T> temp = new Node<>(n);
        if(start==null) {
            start = temp;
            current = start;
        } else {
            end.setNext(temp);
        }
        end =temp;
    }

    LinkedList(T[] n) {
        for(T print : n)
        addNode(print);
    }
    public void addNode(T[] n) {
        if(n!=null) {
            for (T values : n) {
                addNode(values);
            }
        }
    }

    public void incC() {
        current = current.getNext();
    }
    public void insert(T n) {
        Node newNode = new Node(n);
            if(current==start){
                newNode.setNext(current);
                start = newNode;
            }else {
                Node tempstart = start;
                Node prevAdd=null;
                while(tempstart!=current){
                    prevAdd = tempstart;
                    tempstart = tempstart.getNext();
                }
                prevAdd.setNext(newNode);
                newNode.setNext(current);
            }
    }

    public void find(T x) {
        Node tempstart;
        tempstart = start;
        while (tempstart!=null) {
            if(tempstart.getN()==x) {
                System.out.println("Element found");
                tempstart = tempstart.getNext();
            } else {
                tempstart = tempstart.getNext();
            }
        }
    }
    public void delete(T x) {
        Node previous=null;
        Node tempstart = start;
        while(tempstart!=null) {
        if(tempstart.getN()==x) {
            if(previous ==null) {
                previous = tempstart;
                tempstart = tempstart.getNext();
                start = tempstart;
                previous.setNext(null);
                previous = null;
            } else {
                tempstart = tempstart.getNext();
                previous.setNext(tempstart);
            }
        }else {
            previous = tempstart;
            tempstart = tempstart.getNext();
        }
        }
    }
    @Override
    public String toString() {
        Node tempNode = start;
        String str = "Values: ";
        while (tempNode!=null) {
            str = str + " " + tempNode.toString();
            tempNode = tempNode.getNext();
        }
        return str;
    }
}

Trial.java

public class Trial {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    String[] para = {"Hollo","this","is","me"};
    LinkedList<String> L1;
    L1 = new LinkedList<String>(para);
    System.out.println(L1);
}
share|improve this question
    
can you share your code in Trial.main(...) which is calling the LinkedList –  Kshitij May 30 '12 at 7:00
    
@Kshitij done –  Fasih Khatib May 30 '12 at 7:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should declare the start, end, and current fields in LinkedList< T > and the next field in Node< T > as type Node< T >, not Node. Don't use raw types anywhere in the code, because they translate into Node< Object >.

share|improve this answer
    
That solved it for me , Sir however , I have a question. Why isnt next in Node class dectared with <T> and only in LinkedList<> –  Fasih Khatib May 30 '12 at 7:24
    
@FasihKhatib, I'm sorry but I don't follow your question. Did you eliminate all the raw mentions of Node yet? –  Judge Mental May 30 '12 at 7:31
    
Sorry , my bad , read it wrong. Thanks loads :) –  Fasih Khatib May 30 '12 at 7:31
    
Yes, I replaced every instance of Node with Node<T> :) Uhm... do you have any simple exercises on this topic of Generic class ? I would like to practice a bit more 0:) –  Fasih Khatib May 30 '12 at 7:35
1  
return T.toString();

this doesn't work. T is a type variable and only available at compile time due to type erasure.

But apart from that, I can't see what's wrong, you need to poost more code from your LinkedList class.

share|improve this answer
    
@Sean Well, If I was to create a linked list of Integers then I would require that won't I ? I changed the code a little after I posted this. It looks like this now ublic String toString() { if(n instanceof String) return n.toString(); else { return T.toString(n); } } –  Fasih Khatib May 30 '12 at 6:38
    
@FasihKhatib no, just write return n.toString() or null-safe: return String.valueOf(n) –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 30 '12 at 6:40
    
Alright , I will edit the post to include the entire defn of LinkedList.java –  Fasih Khatib May 30 '12 at 6:42
    
T.toString() won't work. You should almost certainly just return n.toString() in all cases. –  Louis Wasserman May 30 '12 at 7:15
    
Done! Still persisting! –  Fasih Khatib May 30 '12 at 7:18

Your class Nodedoes not compile, so it is likely that you should first fix that issue before continuing:

return T.toString();

does not make sense. Probably that just writing this:

return n.toString();

is enough for now.

share|improve this answer
    
No , the error still persists –  Fasih Khatib May 30 '12 at 6:41
    
@FasihKhatib Then edit your question and post the complete code for LinkedList. –  Guillaume Polet May 30 '12 at 6:42
    
@Guilaume Done!! –  Fasih Khatib May 30 '12 at 6:45
    
@FasihKhatib I just ran your code without problems. I only replaced your Node.toString() with public String toString() { return n.toString();} and I could run it without problems. Are you sure that you have properly recompiled your classes? –  Guillaume Polet May 30 '12 at 6:55
    
Yes , Sir. Im using JCrestor LE so all the classes associated with Trial.java (which has the main() method that creates linked list) so I dont have to manually do anyhting –  Fasih Khatib May 30 '12 at 6:57

In Node.java, in the method

@Override 
public String toString() { 
    if(n instanceof String) 
        return n.toString(); 
    else { 
        return T.toString(); 
    } 
} 

// the below statement thows compilation error. return T.toString();

share|improve this answer
    
@JackAss I even Tried return n.toString(); but it still gives that error. Probably something to do with Node.java's constructor –  Fasih Khatib May 30 '12 at 6:49
    
toString() is non static method generally. So if T is a class then T.toString() means that class must have a default toString() as static. but that is not true. hence compilation error. If you take any Class by default it extends Object class hence you get non-static toString(). Hence n.toString() works and T.toString() results in compilation failure –  JackAss May 30 '12 at 6:49
    
I removed that statement so only n.toString() is there now but still there is an error. could it be there is an error in how I defined Node.java class ? –  Fasih Khatib May 30 '12 at 6:52
    
public void addNode(T n) { Node<T> temp = new Node<>(n); if(start==null) { start = temp; current = start; } else { end.setNext(temp); } end =temp; } here Node<T> temp = new Node<>(n); is not a valid statement. –  JackAss May 30 '12 at 6:52
    
@JackAss So how do I modify that ? Node is a stand alone class that encapsulates the data element of the List and has a pointer to the next. Please , tell me why it is an error and how to solve it –  Fasih Khatib May 30 '12 at 6:55

Your Node Constructor is not public, so it will not work if you call it from a class in another package.

share|improve this answer
    
The constructor will work as long as all the source files are in the same directory :) –  Fasih Khatib May 30 '12 at 7:26

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