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Would someone mind converting this line of ternary code to if/then statements. I understand ternary, but am not able to get syntax errors to go away when I convert to if/then. This is the only line of my homework I had to borrow and I'd like to make it into if/then so that I can comment on it and understand it better myself.

Original:

return n == null || isNaN(n) ? 0 : n;

My attempt:

return n == null || if(isNaN(n)){return 0;}else{return n;}
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1  
Thanks gosh there is no stackoverflow for surgeons –  zerkms May 30 '12 at 7:04
2  
My attempt = dead... oops. –  Brian Tucker May 30 '12 at 7:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You have to move the return and have a separate one for the if and the else:

if(n == null || isNaN(n)){
    return 0;
}else{
    return n;
}
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Selected as correct answer since you answered first! Thanks for the help! –  Brian Tucker May 30 '12 at 7:26
    
@BrianTucker No problemo :) –  Paulpro May 30 '12 at 14:02
if (n == null || isNaN(n)) {
  return 0;
} else {
  return n;
}
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if (n == null || isNaN(n))
    return 0;
else 
    return n;
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!n isn't the same as n == null –  Paulpro May 30 '12 at 7:05
    
What about the null value? Is that implied or does it need to be added somehwere? –  Brian Tucker May 30 '12 at 7:05
    
corrected, thanks! –  Petar Ivanov May 30 '12 at 7:05
    
That works. Thanks! –  Brian Tucker May 30 '12 at 7:09

This is what I think it is doing:

if (n == null || isNan(n))
   return 0;
else
   return n;

The || operator has higher precedence than the ? operator.

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You will need to apply some grammatics here:

The other four answers present the correct source code, I don't want to repeat it.

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The problem is that return must be the first statement on any line it appears (as per the ECMA specs).

The code is easier to translate if you first add parentheses ( n == null || (isNaN(n) ? 0 : n) gives different results and is not equivalent to javascript's default parsing of un-parenthesesed code)

return (n == null || isNaN(n)) ? 0 : n;

which is equivalent to

if (n == null || isNaN(n)) {
    return 0;
} else {
    return n;
}
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What would these added parenthesis change? –  Bergi May 30 '12 at 7:19

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