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I'm having trouble understanding how any data structure can be "nonblocking".

Say you're making a "nonblocking" hashtable. At some point or another, your hashtable gets too full, so you have to re-hash into a larger table.

This implies you need to allocate memory, which is a global resource. So it seems that you must obtain some sort of lock to prevent global corruption of the heap... irrespective of possible problems with your data structure itself!
But then that means every other thread must block while you allocate your memory...

What am I missing here?
(How) can you allocate memory without blocking another thread which is doing the same?

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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Two examples for non blocking designs are optimistic design and Transactional Memory.

The idea of this is - in most of the cases, the blocking is redundant - since two OPs can concurrently occur without interrupting each other. However, sometimes when 2 OPs occur concurrently and the data becomes corrupted because of it - you can roll back to your previous state, and retry.

There might still be locks in these designs, but the time the data is locked is significantly shorter, and is limited only to the critical time where the affect of the OP is taking place.

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I see... and what guarantees that you won't get stuck in a retry loop forever? Is it something other than a mutex? –  Mehrdad May 30 '12 at 13:54
    
One possibility is just do a binary exponential backoff until the transaction is successful. Using this method, the probability for infinite loop is smaller then any epsilon>0. You can add a breaking point (usually at iteration ~#16), and try other method to write the data, but the probability of you getting there are very slim. –  amit May 30 '12 at 14:01
    
Ooh that's clever... so it's still unbounded, but it's finite. Cool! +1 –  Mehrdad May 30 '12 at 14:05
    
Sorry, another question: How do you do binary exponential backoff without sleeping? (I guess you could busy-wait, but isn't that worse than sleeping?) –  Mehrdad May 30 '12 at 14:13
    
Two issues here: (1) This solution should be used only when the probability of two threads modifying the data concurrently is slim (for example, 99.9% of data accesses are reads, and only the other are writes), so even if you do need to sleep, it usually worth this overhead. (2) Since this happens when you write, and not read - usually the thread can continue its calculations, and does not need to wait for the write to actually occur, so this wait is not slowing it down. (can be implemented by spawning a writer thread, that will wait and die when the data modification is done). –  amit May 30 '12 at 14:20
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Just for some definitions, additional information and to distinguish between non-blocking, lock-free and wait-free terms, I recommend reading the following article (I won't copy the relevant passages here as it's too long):

Definitions of Non-blocking, Lock-free and Wait-free

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All that non-blocking means is that you never wait indefinitely, not that you never wait at all. As long as your heap is also implemented using a non-blocking algorithm, you can implement other non-blocking algorithms on top of it.

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I don't understand this definition: If the only guarantee is that you won't wait indefinitely, then isn't every sane system nonblocking? Otherwise, the system would be susceptible to being deadlocked, right? –  Mehrdad May 30 '12 at 13:53
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Most strategies have one fundamental pattern in common. They use a compare and swap (CAS) operation in a loop until it succeeds.

For example, lets consider a stack implemented with a linked list. I chose a linked list implementation because it is easy to make concurrent with a CAS, but there are other ways to do it. I will use C-like pseudocode.

Push(T item)
{
  Node node = new Node(); // allocate node memory
  Node initial;
  do
  {
    initial = head;
    node.Value = item;
    node.Next = initial;
  }
  while (CompareAndSwap(head, node, initial) != initial);
}

Pop()
{
  Node node;
  Node initial;
  do
  {
    initial = head;
    node = initial.Next;
  }
  while (CompareAndSwap(head, node, initial) != initial);
  T value = initial.Value;
  delete initial; // deallocate node memory
  return value;
}

In the above code CompareAndSwap is a non-blocking atomic operation that replaces the value in a memory address with a new value and returns the old value. If the old value does not match the expected value then you spin through the loop and try it all again.

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I see... though isn't that just "blocking" the caller? (I guess it's blocking with CPU usage rather than sleeping, but is there any actual difference from the caller's perspective?) –  Mehrdad May 30 '12 at 15:32
    
Well, yeah, it definitely blocks the caller. So in that respect I guess there isn't much of difference from the caller's perspective. But, at least this way all of the callers are executing code and allocating memory simultaneously instead of serializing behind a lock. That is generally how I interpret a "nonblocking data structure" though I'm sure there are other valid interpretations of the phrase. The important thing is that a CAS makes things highly concurrent. –  Brian Gideon May 30 '12 at 18:43
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