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Is there an easier and/or more readable way to create a closure in Ruby so that the defined method has access to the variable m?

I have a slight "problem" with the lambda here.

Very often I dynamically define methods that have to access a local variable:

For example:

class Comparison

  def income
    123
  end

  def sales
    42342
  end

  # and a dozen of other methods

  # Generate xxx_after_tax for each method
  instance_methods(false).each do |m|
    lambda {
      define_method("#{m}_after_tax") do
        send(m) * 0.9
      end
    }.call
  end
end
share|improve this question
1  
are you sure that lambda is required? the closure should work just fine without it. –  tokland May 30 '12 at 9:05
2  
he doesn't need lambda here)) and this is looks very funny, creating lambda and instantly calling it. Lambda is just an anonymus function. –  Yuri Barbashov May 30 '12 at 9:08
    
Yes, it is. Lambda is required to have access to the m variable inside the method definition. –  Dmytrii Nagirniak May 30 '12 at 9:26
1  
I don't know which Ruby are you using, but neither 1.8.7 or 1.9.3 need this lambda. –  tokland May 30 '12 at 11:58
    
Ignore that. It actually works without lambda. Can't remember now when and why I started to wrap it in lambdas. –  Dmytrii Nagirniak May 30 '12 at 13:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
class Comparison

  def income
    123
  end

  def sales
    42342
  end

  # and a dozen of other methods

  # Generate xxx_after_tax for each method
  instance_methods(false).each do |m|

    define_method("#{m}_after_tax") do
      send(m) * 0.9
    end

  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
You cannot do it because you will have no access to variable m from the implementation. –  Dmytrii Nagirniak May 30 '12 at 9:24
    
did u try that? it works...and using lambda here is overkill because u didn't pass variables to lambda, and doesn't make any sense at all)). define_method it is just a function which u call inside iterator, so arguments can include any vars in iterator scope –  Yuri Barbashov May 30 '12 at 9:33
    
@DmytriiNagirniak This is the right answer, I have a minimal test case in my answer which you can try for yourself. –  Gareth May 30 '12 at 9:47
    
Indeed, that is true. I don't understand why I have been using lambda. There definitely were situations where it was required. But can't remember now... –  Dmytrii Nagirniak May 30 '12 at 10:38

Regular method definitions are not closures, but here you are calling define_method with a block, and blocks are closures. This should be sufficient:

instance_methods(false).each do |m|
  define_method :"#{m}_after_tax" do
    send(m) * 0.9
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
I think I gave bad example. So if I would be defining method from a method I would need to create a closure (with lambda or block)? Right? –  Dmytrii Nagirniak May 30 '12 at 14:01
    
@Dmytrii, if you need to capture the local variables available in a given context, you must create a closure. The issue here is that you are creating two: a lambda and the block given to define_method. The former is unnecessary. –  Matheus Moreira May 30 '12 at 14:25

As Yuri points out, the lambda is redundant, which you can see by running this example.

#!/usr/bin/env ruby -w

class Foo
  [:foo, :bar].each do |m|
    define_method("#{m}_dynamic") do
      "Called #{m}"
    end
  end
end

p Foo.new.foo_dynamic # => "Called foo"
share|improve this answer
  instance_methods(false).each do |m|
    class_eval <<-ERUBY, __FILE__, __LINE__
      def #{m}_after_tax
        #{m} * 0.9
      end
    ERUBY
  end
share|improve this answer

You could use method_missing like this:

def method_missing(name, *args, &block)
  if name.to_s.match /^([a-z_]+)_after_tax$/
    send($1)
  else
    super
  end
end

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
There's no need at all to use method_missing. It complicates things. You also have to implement respond_to? and related. It's absolutely overkil here. –  Dmytrii Nagirniak May 30 '12 at 9:25
    
Can you elaborate on why I would have to implement respond_to? –  moritz May 30 '12 at 12:13
    

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