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/*The following program seems to mysteriously enter recursion even though there is none in sight. Compiler: g++ (Ubuntu 4.4.3-4ubuntu5.1) 4.4.3 Machine: x86 OS: Ubuntu 10.04 64-bit

*/

    #include<iostream>
    using namespace std;

    class Test
    {
    public:
      Test ():x(9)
      {
        cout << " Test::Test\n";
        Test (x);
      }
      Test (int a)
      {
        cout << " Test::para\n";
      }
    private:
            int x;
    };


int main(void)
{
 Test a;
return 0;
}

Why is this?

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If i change x to some hard-coded value say any Int , its working fine , else it calls default constructor again n again,, –  PeerPandit May 30 '12 at 9:32
    
Why are you calling the parameterized constructor inside the default constructor?? x is already initialized using the member initializer there. BTW you could also define Test(int a = 9) and omit the default constructor at all. –  πάντα ῥεῖ May 30 '12 at 9:35
1  
Sounds like a compiler bug. –  R. Martinho Fernandes May 30 '12 at 9:42
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes: In 2012 at such a fundamental place? seriously? –  PlasmaHH May 30 '12 at 10:06
    
@PlasmaHH well, we were never told which compiler this is about... For all we know it could be a compiler from the last century. It wouldn't be the first time here on SO. –  R. Martinho Fernandes May 30 '12 at 10:08

2 Answers 2

Test (x);

is parsed as

Test x;

... not as a constructor call. You can also write

Test (y);

and get the same behaviour.

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1  
The old "if it could be a declaration or a statement-expression, it's a declaration" strikes again! –  aschepler May 30 '12 at 10:28
    
Brilliant! Too bad I can only give a single upvote. –  Luchian Grigore May 30 '12 at 11:02

You cannot call other constructors like that in C++. But starting with C++11, you can forward constructor calls in the initialiser list:

class Test {
public:
    Test (): Test(9) {
        cout << " Test::Test\n";
    }

    Test (int a) : x(a) {
        cout << " Test::para\n";
    }

private:
    int x;
};

See Wolfgang’s answer for an explanation of why your code crashes.

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