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I have a small problem with my code in the following. I call it in my class from within a state machine this->write_file(this->d_filename);. The case in the loop gets hit a couple of times, however I only have one line of entries in the CSV file I want to produce.

I'm not sure why this is. I open the file with this->open(filename) in my write function. It returns the file-descriptor. The file is opened with O_TRUNK, and if ((d_new_fp = fdopen(fd, d_is_binary ? "wba" : "w")) == NULL). While the aba refers to write, binary and append. Therefore I expect more than one line.

The fprintf statement writes my data. It also has a \n.

 fprintf(d_new_fp, "%s, %d %d\n", this->d_packet, this->d_lqi, this->d_lqi_sample_count);

I simply can't figure out why my file doesn't grow.

Best, Marius

 inline bool
    cogra_ieee_802_15_4_sink::open(const char *filename)
    {
      gruel::scoped_lock guard(d_mutex); // hold mutex for duration of this function

      // we use the open system call to get access to the O_LARGEFILE flag.
      int fd;
      if ((fd = ::open(filename, O_WRONLY | O_CREAT | O_TRUNC | OUR_O_LARGEFILE,
          0664)) < 0)
        {
          perror(filename);
          return false;
        }

      if (d_new_fp)
        { // if we've already got a new one open, close it
          fclose(d_new_fp);
          d_new_fp = 0;
        }

      if ((d_new_fp = fdopen(fd, d_is_binary ? "wba" : "w")) == NULL)
        {
          perror(filename);
          ::close(fd);
        }

      d_updated = true;
      return d_new_fp != 0;
    }

    inline void
    cogra_ieee_802_15_4_sink::close()
    {
      gruel::scoped_lock guard(d_mutex); // hold mutex for duration of this function

      if (d_new_fp)
        {
          fclose(d_new_fp);
          d_new_fp = 0;
        }
      d_updated = true;
    }

    inline void
    cogra_ieee_802_15_4_sink::write_file(const char* filename)
    {
      if (this->open(filename))
        {

          fprintf(d_new_fp, "%s, %d %d\n", this->d_packet, this->d_lqi,
              this->d_lqi_sample_count);
          if (true)
            {
              fprintf(stderr, "Writing file %x\n", this->d_packet);
            }
        }
    }
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1  
Seems like you forgot to call cogra_ieee_802_15_4_sink::close() method at the end of write_file(). – ismail May 30 '12 at 9:53
1  
O_TRUNC sets the size of the file to 0 bytes – hmjd May 30 '12 at 9:55
    
Every time you call cogra_ieee_802_15_4_sink::write_file you open the file with O_TRUNC, truncating the file to zero length, then you write one line. And you are surprised you only get one line in the file? – Joachim Pileborg May 30 '12 at 9:56
    
jepp, seems I mixed up O_TRUNC and O_APPEND in my head this morning. Thanks :) – wishi May 30 '12 at 10:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Description for O_TRUNC from man open:

If the file already exists and is a regular file and the open mode allows writing (i.e., is O_RDWR or O_WRONLY) it will be truncated to length 0. If the file is a FIFO or terminal device file, the O_TRUNC flag is ignored. Otherwise the effect of O_TRUNC is unspecified.

The file is opened in each call to write_file(), removing anything that was previously written. Replace O_TRUNC with O_APPEND.

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