Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to get a ruby implementation of an encryption lib that's apparently popular in the Java world -- PBEWithMD5AndDES

Does anyone know how to use openssl or another open source gem to perform encryption/decryption that's compatible with this format?

Updated:

I used a gem chilkat to implement it but it is paid, i need an opensource solution.

share|improve this question
    
Does it have to be exactly that algorithm or would PBKDF2 from PKCS#5v2 also do it? – emboss May 30 '12 at 10:31
    
emboss -- I'm way out of my depth with this stuff so I don't know the answer to your question. I can give you an example of the salt, cleartext, key & count as well as the resulting value this should produce if that would help? – Michael May 30 '12 at 10:34
    
Do you have influence on both ends, producing and consuming, or are you just the consumer? In the latter case, I can't help you, but in the former I could :) – emboss May 30 '12 at 10:54
    
I am just the consumer, banging my head against the wall at Java's supposed interoperability! ;-) – Michael May 30 '12 at 11:06
1  
Ah, too bad then. The class that handles password-based encryption in Ruby OpenSSL, OpenSSL::PKCS5, just offers the newer PBKDF2 algorithms. pbeMD5DES isn't considered up-to-date anymore... But if you're up for an adventure, you could use a combination of FFI and native OpenSSL. Maybe, if I get the time, I'll try to come up with a solution, if you can't find anything! – emboss May 30 '12 at 12:05

You don't need to actually implement PBEWithMD5andDES assuming ruby has a DES implementation. What you need to implement is the key derivation function ( who you get a key out of a password) and then feed that derived key to DES with the appropriate mode and padding.

Thankfully, the key derivation function is not particularly security critical in implementation, so you can do it yourself safely enough. According to the rfc, PBEwithMD5AndDES is actually the PBKDF1 ( a ker derivation function) used with DES in CBC mode .

PBKDF1 does not look that hard to implement . Looks like you can do it with a for loop and an md5 call.

Note that you may still get some odd results because of the possibility of a different padding scheme being used in Java and Ruby. I assume that the spec one is pkcs 1.5 padding, but at a quick glance, I can't confirm this

5.1 PBKDF1

PBKDF1 applies a hash function, which shall be MD2 [6], MD5 [19] or SHA-1 [18], to derive keys. The length of the derived key is bounded
by the length of the hash function output, which is 16 octets for MD2 and MD5 and 20 octets for SHA-1. PBKDF1 is compatible with the key
derivation process in PKCS #5 v1.5.

PBKDF1 is recommended only for compatibility with existing
applications since the keys it produces may not be large enough for
some applications.

PBKDF1 (P, S, c, dkLen)

Options: Hash underlying hash function

Input: P password, an octet string S salt, an eight-octet string c iteration count, a positive integer dkLen intended length in octets of derived key, a positive integer, at most 16 for MD2 or MD5 and 20 for SHA-1

Output: DK derived key, a dkLen-octet string

Steps:

  1. If dkLen > 16 for MD2 and MD5, or dkLen > 20 for SHA-1, output
     "derived key too long" and stop.

  2. Apply the underlying hash function Hash for c iterations to the
     concatenation of the password P and the salt S, then extract
     the first dkLen octets to produce a derived key DK:

               T_1 = Hash (P || S) ,
               T_2 = Hash (T_1) ,
               ...
               T_c = Hash (T_{c-1}) ,
               DK = Tc<0..dkLen-1>

  3. Output the derived key DK.
share|improve this answer
    
Even though this is old ... +1 for a correct answer. I know because I solved exactly this problem in python. Did the OP's problem get solved? I can do a ruby implementation of this if you still need it. – Blake Miller Feb 2 '13 at 18:26
    
@BlakeMiller how to implement this in ruby? – Sachin Singh Jan 20 '15 at 6:49
    
@SachinSingh I'd be happy to share my python implementation, it should be straightforward to use it as a reference and implement the same in ruby. PM me if you want it – Blake Miller Feb 2 '15 at 4:32
    
@BlakeMiller thanks, after waiting for few days i bought the gem, what do you mean by PM? – Sachin Singh Feb 2 '15 at 5:17
    
@SachinSingh I meant "private message" me, but it made no sense because Stack Overflow doesn't have that feature. – Blake Miller Feb 25 '15 at 17:27

I know it is super old but I had the same problem and just solved it so here it goes to encrypt, where salt is your salt sting, passkey is your password key string and iterations is number of iterations you want to use

def encrypt_account_number
cipher = OpenSSL::Cipher::Cipher.new("DES")
cipher.encrypt
cipher.pkcs5_keyivgen passkey, salt,iterations,digest
encrypted_account_number =  cipher.update(account_number)
encrypted_account_number << cipher.final
Base64.encode64(encrypted_account_number )
end

def decrypt_account_number
cipher = OpenSSL::Cipher::Cipher.new("DES")
base_64_code = Base64.decode64(account_number)
cipher.decrypt
cipher.pkcs5_keyivgen passkey, salt,iterations,digest

decrypted_account_number = cipher.update base_64_code
decrypted_account_number << cipher.final
decrypted_account_number
end
share|improve this answer

For what its' worth, I'm posting my python code, which actually works (I have tons of encrypted values which were done using org.jasypt.util.text.BasicTextEncryptor, I needed to decrypt them.)

import base64
import hashlib
from Crypto.Cipher import DES

"""
Note about PBEWithMD5AndDES in java crypto library:

Encrypt:
  Generate a salt (random): 8 bytes
  <start derived key generation>
  Append salt to the password
  MD5 Hash it, and hash the result, hash the result ... 1000 times
  MD5 always gives us a 16 byte hash
  Final result: first 8 bytes is the "key" and the next is the "initialization vector"
  (there is something about the first 8 bytes needing to be of odd paraity, therefore
  the least significant bit needs to be changed to 1 if required. We don't do it, 
  maybe the python crypto library does it for us)
  <end derived key generation>

  Pad the input string with 1-8 bytes (note: not 0-7, so we always have padding)
    so that the result is a multiple of 8 bytes. Padding byte value is same as number of 
    bytes being padded, eg, \x07 if 7 bytes need to be padded.
  Use the key and iv to encrypt the input string, using DES with CBC mode.
  Prepend the encrypted value with the salt (needed for decrypting since it is random)
  Base64 encode it -> this is your result

Decrypt:
  Base64 decode the input message
  Extract the salt (first 8 bytes). The rest is the encoded text.
  Use derived key generation as in Encrypt above to get the key and iv
  Decrypt the encoded text using key and iv
  Remove padding -> this is your result

(I only have implemented decrypt here since that's all I needed, 
but encrypt should be straighforward as well)

"""

def get_derived_key(password, salt, count):
    key = password + salt
    for i in range(count):
        m = hashlib.md5(key)
        key = m.digest()
    return (key[:8], key[8:])

def decrypt(msg, password):
    msg_bytes = base64.b64decode(msg)
    salt = msg_bytes[:8]
    enc_text = msg_bytes[8:]
    (dk, iv) = get_derived_key(password, salt, 1000)
    crypter = DES.new(dk, DES.MODE_CBC, iv)
    text = crypter.decrypt(enc_text)
    # remove the padding at the end, if any
    return re.sub(r'[\x01-\x08]','',text)
share|improve this answer

I've updated python script from user3392439, with encrypt support. Wish it helpful.

import base64
import hashlib
import re
import os
from Crypto.Cipher import DES

"""
Note about PBEWithMD5AndDES in java crypto library:

Encrypt:
  Generate a salt (random): 8 bytes
  <start derived key generation>
  Append salt to the password
  MD5 Hash it, and hash the result, hash the result ... 1000 times
  MD5 always gives us a 16 byte hash
  Final result: first 8 bytes is the "key" and the next is the "initialization vector"
  (there is something about the first 8 bytes needing to be of odd paraity, therefore
  the least significant bit needs to be changed to 1 if required. We don't do it,
  maybe the python crypto library does it for us)
  <end derived key generation>

  Pad the input string with 1-8 bytes (note: not 0-7, so we always have padding)
    so that the result is a multiple of 8 bytes. Padding byte value is same as number of
    bytes being padded, eg, \x07 if 7 bytes need to be padded.
  Use the key and iv to encrypt the input string, using DES with CBC mode.
  Prepend the encrypted value with the salt (needed for decrypting since it is random)
  Base64 encode it -> this is your result

Decrypt:
  Base64 decode the input message
  Extract the salt (first 8 bytes). The rest is the encoded text.
  Use derived key generation as in Encrypt above to get the key and iv
  Decrypt the encoded text using key and iv
  Remove padding -> this is your result

(I only have implemented decrypt here since that's all I needed,
but encrypt should be straighforward as well)

"""

def get_derived_key(password, salt, count):
    key = password + salt
    for i in range(count):
        m = hashlib.md5(key)
        key = m.digest()
    return (key[:8], key[8:])

def decrypt(msg, password):
    msg_bytes = base64.b64decode(msg)
    salt = msg_bytes[:8]
    enc_text = msg_bytes[8:]
    (dk, iv) = get_derived_key(password, salt, 1000)
    crypter = DES.new(dk, DES.MODE_CBC, iv)
    text = crypter.decrypt(enc_text)
    # remove the padding at the end, if any
    return re.sub(r'[\x01-\x08]','',text)

def encrypt(msg, password):
    salt = os.urandom(8)
    pad_num = 8 - (len(msg) % 8)
    for i in range(pad_num):
        msg += chr(pad_num)
    (dk, iv) = get_derived_key(password, salt, 1000)
    crypter = DES.new(dk, DES.MODE_CBC, iv)
    enc_text = crypter.encrypt(msg)
    return base64.b64encode(salt + enc_text)

def main():
    msg = "hello, world"
    passwd = "mypassword"
    s = encrypt(msg, passwd)
    print s
    print decrypt(s, passwd)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.