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Being a lazy programmer i usually overlooks compiler warnings both in Jsp and Java code.

I can justify JSP warning by thinking that missing JavaScript, validations and other stuff could be resolved at run-time. but needs to be sure.

but i am always teased by Java warnings like

  • [GENERIC Type] is a raw type. References to generic type [GENERIC TYPE] should be parameterized.

  • The field [FIELD NAME] is never read locally.

and many many more.

My Question is that

Do warnings has any impact on performance ?

  • If not, then why compiler keep shouting?Is helping us to write good code?
  • If may be, then which types of warnings should not be neglected?
  • If yes, (Memory could be) then how deep it is?
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"I can justify JSP warning by thinking that missing JavaScript, validations and other stuff could be resolved at run-time." JSP = JavaServer Pages. They have nothing to do with JavaScript. –  T.J. Crowder May 30 '12 at 10:06
1  
JSPs may contain JavaScript, which in turn may generate errors or warnings already on the compile phase (e.g. when the JS is not enclosed in CDATA tags on XHTML pages and when using ampersands). –  simon May 30 '12 at 10:10
2  
The field [FIELD NAME] is never read locally. is an Eclipse warning. Not a compiler warning. –  adarshr May 30 '12 at 10:10
1  
"Is helping us to write good code?" Yes. –  Louis Wasserman May 30 '12 at 10:10
    
If you ignore [GENERIC Type] is a raw type. References to generic type [GENERIC TYPE] should be parameterized., your application may throw errors and not work as expected. –  adarshr May 30 '12 at 10:11

2 Answers 2

If not, then why compiler keep shouting? Is helping us to write good code?

definitely so. Most of those warnings are "best practices... not practiced" :) Why using raw type if Java now offers generics, for example?

You may have your reasons to neglect them. And then many IDEs gives you the possibility to turn off those warnings.

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Compiler warnings are almost always alerting you of potential unintended behavior or unnecessary code. In all practicality, they do not impact runtime performance of the code. Writing non-performant code (much, much easier to do) is a far greater worry.

As far as unused local variables are concerned, it's possible that some compilers will optimize this and simply not allocate the memory for assignment. The statements which produce the result, however, still need to be executed as they may include side effects.

There are ways to turn off various type of compiler warnings that you acknowledge aren't important to your code (the "should declare a serialVersionUID" warning, for instance, is a common one that's often not particularly applicable). You can do this with the @SuppressWarnings annotation per class / method / field, or you can do it once at the compiler level by supplying options to it.

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