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I'm reading the Llama (Learning Perl) book, and working on the exercises. And for this exercise:

Write a program that reads a list of strings on separate lines until end-of-input and prints out the list in reverse order. [. . .]

Well, I already figured out a simpler approach (I remembered you could use reverse on arrays... Perl is so... awesome so far), but I am wondering why this one isn't working.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use 5.010;

chomp(@strings = <STDIN>);

foreach (@strings){
    push @revstrings, $_;
}

while($i++ <= scalar @revstrings){
    say pop @revstrings;
}

It goes like this:

$ ./first
one
two
three

[^D]
three
two
$

the output is the same if I change the <= in the while loop to just <.

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7  
If I may suggest, do yourself a favor and start using use strict; use warnings; in all your programs from the beginning. This will format your mind to good practices :) –  Damien Jul 4 '09 at 5:29
    
true, but I'm loving how permissive perl is. It just lets you do whatever you want –  Carson Myers Jul 5 '09 at 22:00
3  
And many things you don't want but you did by accident... –  ijw Jul 7 '09 at 19:46
    
At this point in Learning Perl we haven't talked about strict yet because we haven't introduced lexical variables. We get people moving quickly without bogging them down in concepts. For short programs where you have only a couple of variables and can see the whole thing on the screen, it's not such a big deal. –  brian d foy Aug 1 '09 at 18:35
1  
One thing to think about while doing the Llama exercises: if you think you are doing a lot of work, you are. Most of the exercises at the beginning are designed for you to use a single feature. –  brian d foy Aug 1 '09 at 18:39
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2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You'll never get past halfway... Each time through that last iteration, you'd get:

  • $i++ means that $i will increase by one;
  • pop @revstrings will mean that scalar @revstrings will decrease by one.

They'll meet in the middle, when $i++ just exceeds half the original @revstrings length.

Actually, the $i++ is unnecessary, since scalar @revstrings will be zero when the array is empty, so you just need:

while(scalar @revstrings){
    say pop @revstrings;
}
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10  
No need for the 'scalar' either. The while evaluates the conditional in boolean (scalar) context. So while( @revstrings ) { ... } will do the trick. –  daotoad Jul 4 '09 at 4:48
    
@daotoad: +1 good point. –  Stobor Jul 4 '09 at 4:59
    
*smacks forehead*. for some reason I assumed @revstrings would get evaluated only once. Haha, that was a stupid mistake--I had the same problem before with a different structure (I forget what), so I thought I would just use $i++ so that it was just an unrelated count. If I stored the length of @revstrings in a variable and then used that in the loop, I guess it would have worked. Thanks though –  Carson Myers Jul 4 '09 at 8:24
1  
You don't need the second array either: say pop @strings while (@strings); –  Telemachus Jul 4 '09 at 11:25
    
@Telemachus: Damnit, you're right; foreach (@strings){ push @revstrings, $_; } is equivalent to @revstrings = @strings; –  Stobor Jul 4 '09 at 11:49
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EDIT: Short answer is "Because your loop condition is wrong." more verbose "scalar @revstrings is evaluated each iteration".

while (<STDIN>) {
    push @lines, $_
}

while(@lines){
    print pop @lines;
}

less typing

@lines = <STDIN>;

while(@lines){
    print pop @lines;
}

lesser typing

@lines = <STDIN>;
print reverse @lines;

lesser typing

print reverse <>;

but far best solution is

exec("tac");
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2  
It's not the best solution if your goal is to learn Perl. Not to mention that tac isn't present on all systems. I.e., the solution isn't portable. –  Telemachus Jul 4 '09 at 18:21
1  
What happened to print reverse <STDIN>? –  Nietzche-jou Jul 4 '09 at 18:39
1  
Ok, I got curious: tac is mentioned in the question and the answer is print reverse <>. But, again, if he's trying to learn Perl, he also needs to know why his answer didn't work. (Learning Perl chapter 5 if you're playing along at home.) –  Telemachus Jul 4 '09 at 19:43
2  
sub tac { tac() if defined(my $line=<>); print $line } tac –  ysth Jul 5 '09 at 12:08
1  
"print reverse <>" Oh wait, ... we're not going for Perl-golf. –  Brad Gilbert Jul 31 '09 at 22:15
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