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Given the name of a file, how can I determine if the file is currently opened or in-use? (I am talking about files rather than Perl file handles.)

Please note that I am looking for a general-purpose Perl solution rather than an operating system-specific one. At a minimum, I would like something that works both on Windows and GNU/Linux-based systems.

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Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/520196/… –  cppcoder Jun 1 '12 at 11:32
    
@cppcoder: The question you are referring to seems to be about file handles being open. I'm talking about files in this question. –  Sam Jun 4 '12 at 6:42
    
POSIX does not provide any way to do this. Therefore, no portable solution is possible given the current portable O/S interface available. You’d have to craft some higher level approach that provides a single point of access for the opening bits. It’s like with lock files. –  tchrist Jun 4 '12 at 11:19
    
@tchrist, I think I'll accept your answer if you convert that comment into an answer. –  Sam Jun 18 '12 at 8:11
    
What's the solution on Windows? I don't mind if it's Windows-specific? –  Helen Craigman Oct 26 '12 at 1:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

POSIX does not provide any way to do this. Therefore, no portable solution is possible given the current portable O/S interface available.

You’d have to craft some higher level approach that provides a single point of access for the opening bits. It’s like with lock files.

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See the following snippet (only Linux/Unix, you don't tell us which OS you run):

In a one-liner :

perl -e 'my $file = $ARGV[0]; print "file $file is opened" if `lsof $file`;' FILE

In a script :

#!/usr/bin/env perl -w

use strict;

my $file = $ARGV[0];
print "file $file is opened\n" if `lsof $file`;

To run it :

./script.pl FILENAME
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That's probably a good way to do it on a Unix-based system. However, I'm using Windows. A general-purpose solution that doesn't depend on the operating system would be good. –  Sam May 30 '12 at 11:22
    
There's a perl module : search.cpan.org/~marcb/Unix-Lsof-0.0.9/lib/Unix/Lsof.pm but works only on Unix & Unix likes. Maybe working with cygwin can helps there. –  sputnick May 30 '12 at 11:24
    
There's also search.cpan.org/~rjbs/perl-5.16.0/ext/Fcntl/Fcntl.pm –  flesk May 30 '12 at 11:25
1  
@flesk: Can you provide any more information about that module? Is it also Linux specific? If not, can you provide an example of using it to solve this problem? –  Sam Jun 4 '12 at 7:29
    
On OpenBSD, it’s fstat, not lsof. –  tchrist Jun 4 '12 at 11:20

Try this

use strict;
open(IN, ">test");
print IN "Hello";
close(IN);
if(fileno(IN) == undef )
{
    print "File is CLOSED\n";
}
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I'm asking about files rather than file handles. –  Sam Jun 4 '12 at 6:54

I realize you don't want to open the file handle, but it is probably the simplest method IMO:

open my $myfh, '<', $my_file or die "Couldn't open $my_file: $!";
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I think you can typically open files in read mode even if they're already open elsewhere. –  Sam Jun 4 '12 at 6:39

Try Scalar::Util

Function "openhandle"

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I had a look at that function, but it doesn't seem to address the question. However, it's possible that I simply don't know how to use the function to do what I'm asking. –  Sam May 31 '12 at 10:56
    
Yes, sorry, wrong answer. I suppose you'll have to look for windows-specific file opening functions from win32 api. –  Sly May 31 '12 at 17:16

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