Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a JSON-string with a fixed number of arrays of different objects (created in Java with JSONObjects and JSONArrays):

[
  [ //The first type of object
    {
      "Initials":"MUS"
    },
    {
      "Initials":"NA"
    }
  ],
  [ //The second type
    {
      "ToolId":17
    },
    {
      ...
    }
  ]
  ... //etc.
]

So I've created some Dummy-classes that has corresponding properties to the objects within the array, which works:

private class DummyEmployee
{
    public string Initials { get; set; }
}
//etc.

But I can't figure out how the container class should be designed. This is how I did it:

private class DataContainer
{
    public List<DummyEmployee> Employees { get; set; }
    public List<DummySecondType> SecondTypes { get; set; }
    //etc.
}

This is how I attempt to deserialize the JSON-data:

JavaScriptSerializer ser = new JavaScriptSerializer();

string jsonDataFromClient = ...;

DataContainer jsonData = ser.Deserialize<DataContainer>(jsonDataFromClient);

And it doesn't work. I get the following error while passing the data: Type 'GUI.ValidateLoginData+DataContainer' is not supported for deserialization of an array.

I couldn't find any other subjects on the matter of deserializing arrays of different objects.

share|improve this question
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/2962551/… how are you deserializing it, with JSON.net, JavaScriptSerializer... Could you post the code of the Deserialization.... –  jjchiw May 30 '12 at 11:41
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

yes i will not work
notice that in your javascript object is basically an array and because javascript is a dynamic language there it is a valid array
where as c# isnt so an array(or list) must contain objects of same kind. however if you still need to implement this and you have control over your JSON structure edit it to this

{
  Employees:[ //The first type of object
    {
      "Initials":"MUS"
    },
    {
      "Initials":"NA"
    }
  ],
  SecondTypes:[ //The second type
    {
      "ToolId":17
    },
    {
      ...
    }
  ]
  ... //etc.
}

and your current c# object might map correctly.

and if you dont have control over the JSON structure then you have to use dynamic objects in c#
UPDATE:-for the case in which you dont have control over your JSON structure (or you dont wanna edit it).
try deserializing your JSON object to an array of dynamic type
UPDATE 2:- because you are curious try deserializing the existing JSON structure to an object of type List<List<dynamic>> and though i havent tried it but it should work fine.
one disadvantage of this solution however is that you wont be able to distinguish between two different types of objects namely Employee and SecondTypes

share|improve this answer
    
you can do it without dynamics...stackoverflow.com/questions/2962551/… –  jjchiw May 30 '12 at 11:45
    
This could be possible, I think, if I used a JSONObject to hold my JSONArrays instead of a JSONArray to hold them, in the Java-code that creates (serializes) this JSON-string. But are you sure there isn't a solution made for JSONArrays with JSONArrays in them? –  Aske B. May 30 '12 at 11:55
    
@jjchiw So, you're suggesting List<List<X>> ? In that case, what would X be? –  Aske B. May 30 '12 at 11:59
    
@AskeBisgaard - there wont be any problem deserializing an array or arrays.. the problem is that the internal arrays are of different TYPES so a solution like this List<List<x>>() wont do because x isnt constant.. –  Parv Sharma May 30 '12 at 12:05
    
Your solution worked, but I'm still curious to see if it's possible to do this without giving each array property names. I'll give you the answer for now. –  Aske B. May 30 '12 at 12:07
show 3 more comments

Use this online tool to create the C# classes for you. You can then fine tune the classes (Name, etc) as per you need. At least, you can get idea that the model classes that you are creating are correct or not.

JSON to C#

share|improve this answer
    
@Downvoter at least bother to comment. –  Kapil Khandelwal May 30 '12 at 11:38
    
I tried it, just because I wanted to see if it could give me an idea of the design I was looking for - but it doesn't think the JSON-data is valid, which it is. –  Aske B. May 30 '12 at 11:40
    
whichever library you might use.. an array of objects of different types are not valid c# objects. unless you switch to dynamics introduced in c# 4.0 –  Parv Sharma May 30 '12 at 11:42
    
@KapilKhandelwal Here it is if you want it: [[{"Initials":"ABV"},{"Initials":"NA"}],[],[{"Content":"Test","ToolId":17,"Writt‌​enAtTime":"Sat Feb 25 06:10:16 CET 2012","Initials":"ABV"}]] –  Aske B. May 30 '12 at 11:50
add comment

did you add [Serializable] attribute to your DataContainer?

share|improve this answer
    
No. I just tried it and it didn't make a difference. The dummy classes worked without it though, so I don't think it's necessary either. –  Aske B. May 30 '12 at 11:43
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.